Using Analog Telemetry to Measure Usable Life Invasively on the Air Force's Next Generation Reusable Space Booster Equipment

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/581644
Title:
Using Analog Telemetry to Measure Usable Life Invasively on the Air Force's Next Generation Reusable Space Booster Equipment
Author:
Losik, Len
Affiliation:
Failure Analysis
Issue Date:
2012-10
Rights:
Copyright © held by the author; distribution rights International Foundation for Telemetering
Collection Information:
Proceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.
Publisher:
International Foundation for Telemetering
Journal:
International Telemetering Conference Proceedings
Abstract:
Measuring and confirming equipment usable life that passes dynamic environmental factory acceptance testing (ATP) will ensure no equipment will fail prematurely increasing safety and mission assurance on the Air Force's Next Generation Reusable Space Booster (NGRSB). The same analog telemetry generated and analyzed during ATP used to measure and confirm equipment performance per the procurement contract can serve both purposes. Since the NGRSB payload lift requirement is the same as the EELV, the need for exotic combinations of reusable and throwaway components is unnecessary unless they yield new level of reliability, maintainability and supportability. A prognostics and health management (PHM) program exploits the presence of non-repeatable transient events (NRTE) (a.k.a. accelerated aging) that is missed during any engineering analysis in equipment analog telemetry to calculate equipment remaining usable life/mission life. Without an invasive physical measurement of equipment usable life, satellite and launch vehicle equipment reliability is dominated by premature equipment failures. If the Air Force continues to calculate NGRSB equipment mission life on paper, the NGRSB equipment reliability will also be dominated by infant mortality failures just as all expendable launch vehicle equipment is. The Air Force's, Markov-based reliability paradigm used to procure Air Force satellites and launch vehicles, results in space mission infant mortality failure rate as high as 25%/year. According to the Aerospace Corporation, Air Force space vehicle equipment that passes both equipment level and vehicle level ATP has a 70% likelihood of failing prematurely within 45 days after arriving in space. If a PHM is used on the NGRSB, it stops premature failures and lowers life overall cycle cost providing superior reliability, maintainability, supportability and availability for future Air Force space missions that are too important and too expensive to fail prematurely.
Sponsors:
International Foundation for Telemetering
ISSN:
0884-5123; 0074-9079
Additional Links:
http://www.telemetry.org/

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleUsing Analog Telemetry to Measure Usable Life Invasively on the Air Force's Next Generation Reusable Space Booster Equipmenten_US
dc.contributor.authorLosik, Lenen
dc.contributor.departmentFailure Analysisen
dc.date.issued2012-10en
dc.rightsCopyright © held by the author; distribution rights International Foundation for Telemeteringen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationProceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.en_US
dc.publisherInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.abstractMeasuring and confirming equipment usable life that passes dynamic environmental factory acceptance testing (ATP) will ensure no equipment will fail prematurely increasing safety and mission assurance on the Air Force's Next Generation Reusable Space Booster (NGRSB). The same analog telemetry generated and analyzed during ATP used to measure and confirm equipment performance per the procurement contract can serve both purposes. Since the NGRSB payload lift requirement is the same as the EELV, the need for exotic combinations of reusable and throwaway components is unnecessary unless they yield new level of reliability, maintainability and supportability. A prognostics and health management (PHM) program exploits the presence of non-repeatable transient events (NRTE) (a.k.a. accelerated aging) that is missed during any engineering analysis in equipment analog telemetry to calculate equipment remaining usable life/mission life. Without an invasive physical measurement of equipment usable life, satellite and launch vehicle equipment reliability is dominated by premature equipment failures. If the Air Force continues to calculate NGRSB equipment mission life on paper, the NGRSB equipment reliability will also be dominated by infant mortality failures just as all expendable launch vehicle equipment is. The Air Force's, Markov-based reliability paradigm used to procure Air Force satellites and launch vehicles, results in space mission infant mortality failure rate as high as 25%/year. According to the Aerospace Corporation, Air Force space vehicle equipment that passes both equipment level and vehicle level ATP has a 70% likelihood of failing prematurely within 45 days after arriving in space. If a PHM is used on the NGRSB, it stops premature failures and lowers life overall cycle cost providing superior reliability, maintainability, supportability and availability for future Air Force space missions that are too important and too expensive to fail prematurely.en
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.identifier.issn0884-5123en
dc.identifier.issn0074-9079en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/581644en
dc.identifier.journalInternational Telemetering Conference Proceedingsen
dc.typetexten
dc.typeProceedingsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.telemetry.org/en
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