Desert and Death: Biopolitical Landscapes and Affect in US-Mexico Border Representations

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/581327
Title:
Desert and Death: Biopolitical Landscapes and Affect in US-Mexico Border Representations
Author:
Johannes, Daniela
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release 13-Aug-2017
Abstract:
This thesis studies the state of current border politics as it can be read through three objects of representation. These correspond to the three chapters. The first deals with a map, read as a text that represents death, made by the Humane Borders organization. The second treats a literary text (2666 by Roberto Bolaño) that also represents death and the border landscape and announces a failure of representation when treating a contemporary horror. The third chapter treats a technological tool thought of as electronic disturbance, designed to help migrants navigate the arduous terrain while crossing to the U.S. On one hand this work is concerned with death at the border as an irreversible fact and also as a matter of representation. Death at the border has been used as a trope to represent migrants and their afflictions (regarded many times as a consequence of ignorance, wildness or uncivilization). It has also been used as part of a political agenda: constructing migrants' illegality and death as a consequence for misconduct. On the other hand, this thesis is concerned with the trope of the desert as the space and a landscape that today is not dissociable from the meanings of death. The analysis takes a discursive angle, but also takes the desert as a material environment, which constitutes a tangible reference in which the practices of sovereignty are carried out. It also considers death as a real, embodied fact. This landscape of death has been marked by the intensification of border control as well as the intensification of humanitarian activism. Indeed, the desert is a site that highlights the precariousness of what is understood to be human life. "The human" moves in and out of being through the interaction of physical political and social elements. This thesis, thus, is concerned with the material and the discursive dimensions that shape the Sonoran Desert as the border between states, between human and non-human matter and as a bordering practice regarding the governance of a population.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Spanish
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Spanish
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Compitello, Malcolm A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleDesert and Death: Biopolitical Landscapes and Affect in US-Mexico Border Representationsen_US
dc.creatorJohannes, Danielaen
dc.contributor.authorJohannes, Danielaen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.releaseRelease 13-Aug-2017en
dc.description.abstractThis thesis studies the state of current border politics as it can be read through three objects of representation. These correspond to the three chapters. The first deals with a map, read as a text that represents death, made by the Humane Borders organization. The second treats a literary text (2666 by Roberto Bolaño) that also represents death and the border landscape and announces a failure of representation when treating a contemporary horror. The third chapter treats a technological tool thought of as electronic disturbance, designed to help migrants navigate the arduous terrain while crossing to the U.S. On one hand this work is concerned with death at the border as an irreversible fact and also as a matter of representation. Death at the border has been used as a trope to represent migrants and their afflictions (regarded many times as a consequence of ignorance, wildness or uncivilization). It has also been used as part of a political agenda: constructing migrants' illegality and death as a consequence for misconduct. On the other hand, this thesis is concerned with the trope of the desert as the space and a landscape that today is not dissociable from the meanings of death. The analysis takes a discursive angle, but also takes the desert as a material environment, which constitutes a tangible reference in which the practices of sovereignty are carried out. It also considers death as a real, embodied fact. This landscape of death has been marked by the intensification of border control as well as the intensification of humanitarian activism. Indeed, the desert is a site that highlights the precariousness of what is understood to be human life. "The human" moves in and out of being through the interaction of physical political and social elements. This thesis, thus, is concerned with the material and the discursive dimensions that shape the Sonoran Desert as the border between states, between human and non-human matter and as a bordering practice regarding the governance of a population.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectSpanishen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineSpanishen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorCompitello, Malcolm A.en
dc.contributor.committeememberCompitello, Malcolm A.en
dc.contributor.committeememberDuran, Javieren
dc.contributor.committeememberJones III, John Paulen
dc.contributor.committeememberTatum, Charlesen
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.