Controlling Light-Matter Interaction in Semiconductors with Hybrid Nano-Structures

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/581325
Title:
Controlling Light-Matter Interaction in Semiconductors with Hybrid Nano-Structures
Author:
Gehl, Michael R.
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Nano-structures, such as photonic crystal cavities and metallic antennas, allow one to focus and store optical energy into very small volumes, greatly increasing light-matter interactions. These structures produce resonances which are typically characterized by how well they confine energy both temporally (quality factor–Q) and spatially (mode volume–V). In order to observe non-linear effects, modified spontaneous emission (e.g. Purcell enhancement), or quantum effects (e.g. vacuum Rabi splitting), one needs to maximize the ratio of Q/V while also maximizing the coupling between the resonance and the active medium. In this dissertation I will discuss several projects related by the goal of controlling light-matter interactions using such nano-structures. In the first portion of this dissertation I will discuss the deterministic placement of self-assembled InAs quantum dots, which would allow one to precisely position an optically-active material, for maximum interaction, inside of a photonic crystal cavity. Additionally, I will discuss the use of atomic layer deposition to tune and improve both the resonance wavelength and quality factor of silicon based photonic crystal cavities. Moving from dielectric materials to metals allows one to achieve mode-volumes well below the diffraction limit. The quality factor of these resonators is severely limited by Ohmic loss in the metal; however, the small mode-volume still allows for greatly enhanced light-matter interaction. In the second portion of this dissertation I will investigate the coupling between an array of metallic resonators (antennas) and a nearby semiconductor quantum well. Using time-resolved pump-probe measurements I study the properties of the coupled system and compare the results to a model which allows one to quantitatively compare various antenna geometries.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Photonic Crystals; Plasmonics; Quantum Dots; Semiconductors; Optical Sciences; Nano-Photonics
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Optical Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Khitrova, Galina

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleControlling Light-Matter Interaction in Semiconductors with Hybrid Nano-Structuresen_US
dc.creatorGehl, Michael R.en
dc.contributor.authorGehl, Michael R.en
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractNano-structures, such as photonic crystal cavities and metallic antennas, allow one to focus and store optical energy into very small volumes, greatly increasing light-matter interactions. These structures produce resonances which are typically characterized by how well they confine energy both temporally (quality factor–Q) and spatially (mode volume–V). In order to observe non-linear effects, modified spontaneous emission (e.g. Purcell enhancement), or quantum effects (e.g. vacuum Rabi splitting), one needs to maximize the ratio of Q/V while also maximizing the coupling between the resonance and the active medium. In this dissertation I will discuss several projects related by the goal of controlling light-matter interactions using such nano-structures. In the first portion of this dissertation I will discuss the deterministic placement of self-assembled InAs quantum dots, which would allow one to precisely position an optically-active material, for maximum interaction, inside of a photonic crystal cavity. Additionally, I will discuss the use of atomic layer deposition to tune and improve both the resonance wavelength and quality factor of silicon based photonic crystal cavities. Moving from dielectric materials to metals allows one to achieve mode-volumes well below the diffraction limit. The quality factor of these resonators is severely limited by Ohmic loss in the metal; however, the small mode-volume still allows for greatly enhanced light-matter interaction. In the second portion of this dissertation I will investigate the coupling between an array of metallic resonators (antennas) and a nearby semiconductor quantum well. Using time-resolved pump-probe measurements I study the properties of the coupled system and compare the results to a model which allows one to quantitatively compare various antenna geometries.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectPhotonic Crystalsen
dc.subjectPlasmonicsen
dc.subjectQuantum Dotsen
dc.subjectSemiconductorsen
dc.subjectOptical Sciencesen
dc.subjectNano-Photonicsen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineOptical Sciencesen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorKhitrova, Galinaen
dc.contributor.committeememberKhitrova, Galinaen
dc.contributor.committeememberAnderson, Brian P.en
dc.contributor.committeememberKieu, Khanhen
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.