Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/581323
Title:
Nucleoside and HIV Drug Transport at the Blood-Testis Barrier
Author:
Klein, David Michael
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The immune-reactive sperm are kept separate from the body by epithelial barriers such as the blood-testis barrier (BTB). While these barriers are beneficial for the protection of sperm from toxicants, they can make treating these areas difficult due to preventing the entry of pharmacological agents. This is especially an issue in the treatment of HIV and Ebola infection based on the ample evidence that these viruses are able to survive and spread from within the male genital tract (MGT), but only a few antiviral drugs are known to access the MGT. Transporters that line the epithelial barriers of the MGT, especially the BTB, are important for determining whether or not a drug is able to penetrate into the MGT through transepithelial transport. Several nucleoside analogs (NSA), which are used to treat HIV infection and leukemias, are known to be able to accumulate in seminal plasma, which makes them a useful tool for understanding transepithelial transport for the BTB. The purpose of these studies is to characterize the transport profile for the MGT, in particular the BTB, to gain a better understanding of how xenobiotics, especially ones based on nucleosides, can access the MGT. The chief finding of this work is the discovery of a transepithelial transport pathway expressed by Sertoli cells that allows for the entry of nucleosides (necessary for germ cell development) and NSA into the MGT. This pathway depends on equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) 1 uptake and ENT2 efflux and occurs in both rats and humans. These studies provide the foundation for being able to predict the penetration of novel drugs into the MGT.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
HIV Drugs; Male Genital Tract; Nucleoside; Nucleoside Analogs; Transport; Pharmacology & Toxicology; Blood-testis Barrier
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Pharmacology & Toxicology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Cherrington, Nathan J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleNucleoside and HIV Drug Transport at the Blood-Testis Barrieren_US
dc.creatorKlein, David Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorKlein, David Michaelen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe immune-reactive sperm are kept separate from the body by epithelial barriers such as the blood-testis barrier (BTB). While these barriers are beneficial for the protection of sperm from toxicants, they can make treating these areas difficult due to preventing the entry of pharmacological agents. This is especially an issue in the treatment of HIV and Ebola infection based on the ample evidence that these viruses are able to survive and spread from within the male genital tract (MGT), but only a few antiviral drugs are known to access the MGT. Transporters that line the epithelial barriers of the MGT, especially the BTB, are important for determining whether or not a drug is able to penetrate into the MGT through transepithelial transport. Several nucleoside analogs (NSA), which are used to treat HIV infection and leukemias, are known to be able to accumulate in seminal plasma, which makes them a useful tool for understanding transepithelial transport for the BTB. The purpose of these studies is to characterize the transport profile for the MGT, in particular the BTB, to gain a better understanding of how xenobiotics, especially ones based on nucleosides, can access the MGT. The chief finding of this work is the discovery of a transepithelial transport pathway expressed by Sertoli cells that allows for the entry of nucleosides (necessary for germ cell development) and NSA into the MGT. This pathway depends on equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) 1 uptake and ENT2 efflux and occurs in both rats and humans. These studies provide the foundation for being able to predict the penetration of novel drugs into the MGT.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectHIV Drugsen
dc.subjectMale Genital Tracten
dc.subjectNucleosideen
dc.subjectNucleoside Analogsen
dc.subjectTransporten
dc.subjectPharmacology & Toxicologyen
dc.subjectBlood-testis Barrieren
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePharmacology & Toxicologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorCherrington, Nathan J.en
dc.contributor.committeememberCherrington, Nathan J.en
dc.contributor.committeememberDantzler, Williamen
dc.contributor.committeememberMonks, Terranceen
dc.contributor.committeememberRonaldson, Patricken
dc.contributor.committeememberWright, Stephen H.en
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.