Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/581305
Title:
Computational Imaging For Miniature Cameras
Author:
Salahieh, Basel
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Miniature cameras play a key role in numerous imaging applications ranging from endoscopy and metrology inspection devices to smartphones and head-mount acquisition systems. However, due to the physical constraints, the imaging conditions, and the low quality of small optics, their imaging capabilities are limited in terms of the delivered resolution, the acquired depth of field, and the captured dynamic range. Computational imaging jointly addresses the imaging system and the reconstructing algorithms to bypass the traditional limits of optical systems and deliver better restorations for various applications. The scene is encoded into a set of efficient measurements which could then be computationally decoded to output a richer estimate of the scene as compared with the raw images captured by conventional imagers. In this dissertation, three task-based computational imaging techniques are developed to make low-quality miniature cameras capable of delivering realistic high-resolution reconstructions, providing full-focus imaging, and acquiring depth information for high dynamic range objects. For the superresolution task, a non-regularized direct superresolution algorithm is developed to achieve realistic restorations without being penalized by improper assumptions (e.g., optimizers, priors, and regularizers) made in the inverse problem. An adaptive frequency-based filtering scheme is introduced to upper bound the reconstruction errors while still producing more fine details as compared with previous methods under realistic imaging conditions. For the full-focus imaging task, a computational depth-based deconvolution technique is proposed to bring a scene captured by an ordinary fixed-focus camera to a full-focus based on a depth-variant point spread function prior. The ringing artifacts are suppressed on three levels: block tiling to eliminate boundary artifacts, adaptive reference maps to reduce ringing initiated by sharp edges, and block-wise deconvolution or depth-based masking to suppress artifacts initiated by neighboring depth-transition surfaces. Finally for the depth acquisition task, a multi-polarization fringe projection imaging technique is introduced to eliminate saturated points and enhance the fringe contrast by selecting the proper polarized channel measurements. The developed technique can be easily extended to include measurements captured under different exposure times to obtain more accurate shape rendering for very high dynamic range objects.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Computational Imaging; Deconvolution; Depth Estimation; Image Reconstruction; Superresolution; Electrical & Computer Engineering; Cameras
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Electrical & Computer Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Liang, Rongguang; Rodriguez, Jeffrey J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleComputational Imaging For Miniature Camerasen_US
dc.creatorSalahieh, Baselen
dc.contributor.authorSalahieh, Baselen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractMiniature cameras play a key role in numerous imaging applications ranging from endoscopy and metrology inspection devices to smartphones and head-mount acquisition systems. However, due to the physical constraints, the imaging conditions, and the low quality of small optics, their imaging capabilities are limited in terms of the delivered resolution, the acquired depth of field, and the captured dynamic range. Computational imaging jointly addresses the imaging system and the reconstructing algorithms to bypass the traditional limits of optical systems and deliver better restorations for various applications. The scene is encoded into a set of efficient measurements which could then be computationally decoded to output a richer estimate of the scene as compared with the raw images captured by conventional imagers. In this dissertation, three task-based computational imaging techniques are developed to make low-quality miniature cameras capable of delivering realistic high-resolution reconstructions, providing full-focus imaging, and acquiring depth information for high dynamic range objects. For the superresolution task, a non-regularized direct superresolution algorithm is developed to achieve realistic restorations without being penalized by improper assumptions (e.g., optimizers, priors, and regularizers) made in the inverse problem. An adaptive frequency-based filtering scheme is introduced to upper bound the reconstruction errors while still producing more fine details as compared with previous methods under realistic imaging conditions. For the full-focus imaging task, a computational depth-based deconvolution technique is proposed to bring a scene captured by an ordinary fixed-focus camera to a full-focus based on a depth-variant point spread function prior. The ringing artifacts are suppressed on three levels: block tiling to eliminate boundary artifacts, adaptive reference maps to reduce ringing initiated by sharp edges, and block-wise deconvolution or depth-based masking to suppress artifacts initiated by neighboring depth-transition surfaces. Finally for the depth acquisition task, a multi-polarization fringe projection imaging technique is introduced to eliminate saturated points and enhance the fringe contrast by selecting the proper polarized channel measurements. The developed technique can be easily extended to include measurements captured under different exposure times to obtain more accurate shape rendering for very high dynamic range objects.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectComputational Imagingen
dc.subjectDeconvolutionen
dc.subjectDepth Estimationen
dc.subjectImage Reconstructionen
dc.subjectSuperresolutionen
dc.subjectElectrical & Computer Engineeringen
dc.subjectCamerasen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineElectrical & Computer Engineeringen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorLiang, Rongguangen
dc.contributor.advisorRodriguez, Jeffrey J.en
dc.contributor.committeememberLiang, Rongguangen
dc.contributor.committeememberRodriguez, Jeffrey J.en
dc.contributor.committeememberBilgin, Alien
dc.contributor.committeememberMilster, Thomas D.en
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