Negotiated Identities of Second-Generation Vietnamese Heritage Speakers: Implications for the Multilingual Composition Classroom

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/581279
Title:
Negotiated Identities of Second-Generation Vietnamese Heritage Speakers: Implications for the Multilingual Composition Classroom
Author:
Do, Tom Hong
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Grounded in interdisciplinary scholarship to include rhetoric and composition, applied linguistics, and heritage languages, my dissertation, Negotiated Identities of Second-Generation Vietnamese Heritage Speakers: Implications for the Multilingual Composition Classroom, is a qualitative study that explores how Vietnamese heritage speakers negotiate multiple identities in different social contexts. I define heritage speakers as asymmetrical bilinguals who were raised in a non-English speaking household but whose dominant language is now English. While findings from this study reveal that heritage speakers struggle to claim a linguistic identity because of discrimination from members of different Vietnamese communities, they nonetheless—through reflexive and interactive positioning—resist these communities' discriminatory practices by constructing and negotiating multiple identities that enable them to reimagine themselves as legitimate members of an imagined Vietnamese community. By focusing on speakers' negotiated identities, this dissertation departs from the traditional emphasis in heritage language and composition studies that equate language proficiency with cultural identity. Instead, it calls for a more nuanced understanding of identity formation that not only engages speakers' multiple spheres of belonging but also informs current pedagogical practices that seek to incorporate speakers' heritage languages as linguistic resources in the composition classroom.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Culture; Heritage Language; Identity; Language; Rhetoric; Rhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of English; Composition
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Rhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of English
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Miller, Thomas P.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleNegotiated Identities of Second-Generation Vietnamese Heritage Speakers: Implications for the Multilingual Composition Classroomen_US
dc.creatorDo, Tom Hongen
dc.contributor.authorDo, Tom Hongen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractGrounded in interdisciplinary scholarship to include rhetoric and composition, applied linguistics, and heritage languages, my dissertation, Negotiated Identities of Second-Generation Vietnamese Heritage Speakers: Implications for the Multilingual Composition Classroom, is a qualitative study that explores how Vietnamese heritage speakers negotiate multiple identities in different social contexts. I define heritage speakers as asymmetrical bilinguals who were raised in a non-English speaking household but whose dominant language is now English. While findings from this study reveal that heritage speakers struggle to claim a linguistic identity because of discrimination from members of different Vietnamese communities, they nonetheless—through reflexive and interactive positioning—resist these communities' discriminatory practices by constructing and negotiating multiple identities that enable them to reimagine themselves as legitimate members of an imagined Vietnamese community. By focusing on speakers' negotiated identities, this dissertation departs from the traditional emphasis in heritage language and composition studies that equate language proficiency with cultural identity. Instead, it calls for a more nuanced understanding of identity formation that not only engages speakers' multiple spheres of belonging but also informs current pedagogical practices that seek to incorporate speakers' heritage languages as linguistic resources in the composition classroom.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectCultureen
dc.subjectHeritage Languageen
dc.subjectIdentityen
dc.subjectLanguageen
dc.subjectRhetoricen
dc.subjectRhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of Englishen
dc.subjectCompositionen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineRhetoric, Composition & the Teaching of Englishen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorMiller, Thomas P.en
dc.contributor.committeememberMiller, Thomas P.en
dc.contributor.committeememberWaugh, Linda R.en
dc.contributor.committeememberVillanueva, Victor Jren
dc.contributor.committeememberBaca, Damianen
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