The Effects of Developmental Nicotine Exposure on Glutamatergic Neurotransmission in Neural Control of Breathing in Neonatal Rats

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/579428
Title:
The Effects of Developmental Nicotine Exposure on Glutamatergic Neurotransmission in Neural Control of Breathing in Neonatal Rats
Author:
Heller, Briena Moselle
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The aim of this literature review is to explore how the neural control of breathing in neonatal rats is affected with the primary focus on DNE-induced changes in glutamatergic neurotransmission. All living organisms need to breathe in order to sustain life. This essential and complex phenomenon is a rhythmic process utilizing the lungs, muscles controlling lower and upper airways, the nerves the innervate these muscles, and the brainstem and cortex neural networks controlling them. Rhythmogenesis of respiration is generated and maintained by respiratory neurons in the medulla and pons of the brainstem. Nicotine is a primary focus of research obtained for this paper as studies suggest that disruptions to this rhythm generation affecting successful respiration are attributed to nicotine in cigarettes. The age group with the highest percentage of cigarette usage is those of childbearing age. Prenatal smoking allows toxins from cigarettes to damage various tissues in the unborn fetus resulting in an abundance of health problems including obstructive sleep apneas and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). This review will concentrate on the effects of DNE on glutamatergic neurotransmission as alteration to excitatory neurotransmission impacting the brainstem regions responsible for controlling the tongue muscles that are essential for natural breathing.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Neuroscience and Cognitive Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Fregosi, Ralph; Cholanian, Marina

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleThe Effects of Developmental Nicotine Exposure on Glutamatergic Neurotransmission in Neural Control of Breathing in Neonatal Ratsen_US
dc.contributor.authorHeller, Briena Moselleen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this literature review is to explore how the neural control of breathing in neonatal rats is affected with the primary focus on DNE-induced changes in glutamatergic neurotransmission. All living organisms need to breathe in order to sustain life. This essential and complex phenomenon is a rhythmic process utilizing the lungs, muscles controlling lower and upper airways, the nerves the innervate these muscles, and the brainstem and cortex neural networks controlling them. Rhythmogenesis of respiration is generated and maintained by respiratory neurons in the medulla and pons of the brainstem. Nicotine is a primary focus of research obtained for this paper as studies suggest that disruptions to this rhythm generation affecting successful respiration are attributed to nicotine in cigarettes. The age group with the highest percentage of cigarette usage is those of childbearing age. Prenatal smoking allows toxins from cigarettes to damage various tissues in the unborn fetus resulting in an abundance of health problems including obstructive sleep apneas and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). This review will concentrate on the effects of DNE on glutamatergic neurotransmission as alteration to excitatory neurotransmission impacting the brainstem regions responsible for controlling the tongue muscles that are essential for natural breathing.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNeuroscience and Cognitive Scienceen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorFregosi, Ralphen
dc.contributor.advisorCholanian, Marinaen
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