Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/579418
Title:
An Examination of Retinal Vasculature in the Early Diabetic Mouse
Author:
Roman, Jordan Michele
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Diabetic retinopathy, an eye disease caused by the long-term hyperglycemia that is characteristic of diabetes mellitus, is the leading cause of blindness in adults in the United States of America (CDC, 2013). With the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus, especially in younger adults, diabetic retinopathy is becoming a more-widespread problem. There are no cures for this form of retinopathy. In fact, the treatment options that are currently available, including surgical vitrectomy, anti-VEGF injections, and intraocular steroid injects, are not possible in the early stages of the disease, do not eliminate the ultimate risk of blindness, and come with their own, very serious, risks and side effects. Thus, it is necessary to characterize changes that are occurring in the retina in the early stages of diabetes in order to find possible therapeutic targets that will help to prevent blindness. This study focuses on the characterizing the vasculature of the retina in STZ-treated mice (a model for type 1 diabetes mellitus) compared to control mice. The lengths and diameters of capillary branches in each of three vascular plexuses were measured and analyzed for both conditions, which revealed no significant differences, neither qualitative nor quantitative.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.H.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Physiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Eggers, Erika

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleAn Examination of Retinal Vasculature in the Early Diabetic Mouseen_US
dc.contributor.authorRoman, Jordan Micheleen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractDiabetic retinopathy, an eye disease caused by the long-term hyperglycemia that is characteristic of diabetes mellitus, is the leading cause of blindness in adults in the United States of America (CDC, 2013). With the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus, especially in younger adults, diabetic retinopathy is becoming a more-widespread problem. There are no cures for this form of retinopathy. In fact, the treatment options that are currently available, including surgical vitrectomy, anti-VEGF injections, and intraocular steroid injects, are not possible in the early stages of the disease, do not eliminate the ultimate risk of blindness, and come with their own, very serious, risks and side effects. Thus, it is necessary to characterize changes that are occurring in the retina in the early stages of diabetes in order to find possible therapeutic targets that will help to prevent blindness. This study focuses on the characterizing the vasculature of the retina in STZ-treated mice (a model for type 1 diabetes mellitus) compared to control mice. The lengths and diameters of capillary branches in each of three vascular plexuses were measured and analyzed for both conditions, which revealed no significant differences, neither qualitative nor quantitative.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.H.S.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorEggers, Erikaen
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.