The Effect of One Touch STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) Program Education on Students' Perception of and Self-Identification with STEM and Scientists

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/579417
Title:
The Effect of One Touch STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) Program Education on Students' Perception of and Self-Identification with STEM and Scientists
Author:
Sedler, Jennifer Leanne
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
While science subjects intrigue a large percentage of young students, the numbers continually drop over the course of pre-college exposure to the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) topics. Therefore this study was designed to assess the effectiveness of ‘One Touch' STEM education programs in changing students' perception of STEM and/or scientists. It in particular asks if it affects one gender or age more than another. The results indicated that 1ˢᵗ grade students began with the least ability to identify with STEM and scientists (with pre-survey questions averaging 2.13 on a scale indicating ‘positive identification' while 5ᵗʰ, 8ᵗʰ, and 11ᵗʰ grade students averaged 2.45, 2.32, and 2.42, respectively) and also showed the greatest potential for change (with an average change of 42.34% while 5ᵗʰ, 8ᵗʰ, and 11ᵗʰ grade students averaged 30.25%, 24.15%, and 26.70%, respectively). The results also showed that female students began with the least ability to identify with STEM and scientists (with pre survey questions averaging 2.30 while male students averaged 2.42), and showed a greater potential for change (with an average change of 31.97% while male students averaged 24.55%). Results of this study suggest that STEM education should begin early and address gender stereotypes. With this information, STEM advocates in Tucson will be able to better utilize funding and understand their target populations.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.H.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Physiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rankin, Lucinda

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleThe Effect of One Touch STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) Program Education on Students' Perception of and Self-Identification with STEM and Scientistsen_US
dc.contributor.authorSedler, Jennifer Leanneen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractWhile science subjects intrigue a large percentage of young students, the numbers continually drop over the course of pre-college exposure to the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) topics. Therefore this study was designed to assess the effectiveness of ‘One Touch' STEM education programs in changing students' perception of STEM and/or scientists. It in particular asks if it affects one gender or age more than another. The results indicated that 1ˢᵗ grade students began with the least ability to identify with STEM and scientists (with pre-survey questions averaging 2.13 on a scale indicating ‘positive identification' while 5ᵗʰ, 8ᵗʰ, and 11ᵗʰ grade students averaged 2.45, 2.32, and 2.42, respectively) and also showed the greatest potential for change (with an average change of 42.34% while 5ᵗʰ, 8ᵗʰ, and 11ᵗʰ grade students averaged 30.25%, 24.15%, and 26.70%, respectively). The results also showed that female students began with the least ability to identify with STEM and scientists (with pre survey questions averaging 2.30 while male students averaged 2.42), and showed a greater potential for change (with an average change of 31.97% while male students averaged 24.55%). Results of this study suggest that STEM education should begin early and address gender stereotypes. With this information, STEM advocates in Tucson will be able to better utilize funding and understand their target populations.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.H.S.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorRankin, Lucindaen
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