Characterizing Various Cup Proteins Involved in Lysosome Formation and Transport

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/579415
Title:
Characterizing Various Cup Proteins Involved in Lysosome Formation and Transport
Author:
George, Laeth Louay
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Lysosomes are the main degradative organelles in eukaryotic cells and are essential for many cellular processes, including endocytosis, apoptosis, and autophagy. However, little is known about how they form. Endocytosed material is trafficked from early endosomes to late endosomes; materials destined for degradation are concentrated in structures that bud and separate from late endosomes, forming lysosomes. Acid hydrolases and other enzymes responsible for degradation are trafficked to these lysosomes to effect degradation. There are only two genes known to be essential for lysosome formation, rab-2 and cup-5 in Caenorhabditis elegans. Due to the complexity of lysosome formation, which includes budding, extension, and fission, we hypothesize that there are other genes involved in lysosome formation. A mutagenesis screen was conducted to identify different genes involved in lysosome formation. We used transgenic wild type C. elegans that secrete green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the body wall muscles into the body cavity of the worm; this GFP is endocytosed and degraded in lysosomes of scavenger cells called coelomocytes. We mutagenized these worms and identified mutants that had bright green coelomocytes indicative of defects in lysosome formation and/or function. We report our analysis of these new cup mutants and their possible functions in lysosomes.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.H.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Physiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Fares, Hanna

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleCharacterizing Various Cup Proteins Involved in Lysosome Formation and Transporten_US
dc.contributor.authorGeorge, Laeth Louayen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractLysosomes are the main degradative organelles in eukaryotic cells and are essential for many cellular processes, including endocytosis, apoptosis, and autophagy. However, little is known about how they form. Endocytosed material is trafficked from early endosomes to late endosomes; materials destined for degradation are concentrated in structures that bud and separate from late endosomes, forming lysosomes. Acid hydrolases and other enzymes responsible for degradation are trafficked to these lysosomes to effect degradation. There are only two genes known to be essential for lysosome formation, rab-2 and cup-5 in Caenorhabditis elegans. Due to the complexity of lysosome formation, which includes budding, extension, and fission, we hypothesize that there are other genes involved in lysosome formation. A mutagenesis screen was conducted to identify different genes involved in lysosome formation. We used transgenic wild type C. elegans that secrete green fluorescent protein (GFP) from the body wall muscles into the body cavity of the worm; this GFP is endocytosed and degraded in lysosomes of scavenger cells called coelomocytes. We mutagenized these worms and identified mutants that had bright green coelomocytes indicative of defects in lysosome formation and/or function. We report our analysis of these new cup mutants and their possible functions in lysosomes.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.H.S.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorFares, Hannaen
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