Gangnam Style: Alcohol and the Cardiovascular System (Comparing US and South Korea)

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/579409
Title:
Gangnam Style: Alcohol and the Cardiovascular System (Comparing US and South Korea)
Author:
Oh, Jeeeun
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The relationship between alcohol and the cardiovascular system (CVS) can have serious effects on the whole system. Excessive consumption causes damage while moderate consumption (1 drink/day for women; 2 drinks/day for men) can be protective. Moderate alcohol intake has been proven to show health benefits by increasing levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and preventing clot formation which reduces the risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. However, excessive alcohol intake can lead to development of chronic diseases. By comparing alcohol consumption between the US and South Korea, it was discovered that factors such as location, culture, as well as, occupation, play a role in both the type and amount of alcohol consumed. In both nations, alcohol consumption has been increasing each year. A study showed that 16,749 deaths were due to alcoholic liver disease in 2011 in the United States. In Korea, the percentage of cases of chronic liver diseases as incidences of acute pancreatitis have increased. Lastly, although many studies show the affect of alcohol on arteries and arterioles, not much work has been done on capillaries and veins.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.H.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Physiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Cohen, Zoe

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleGangnam Style: Alcohol and the Cardiovascular System (Comparing US and South Korea)en_US
dc.contributor.authorOh, Jeeeunen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe relationship between alcohol and the cardiovascular system (CVS) can have serious effects on the whole system. Excessive consumption causes damage while moderate consumption (1 drink/day for women; 2 drinks/day for men) can be protective. Moderate alcohol intake has been proven to show health benefits by increasing levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and preventing clot formation which reduces the risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and diabetes. However, excessive alcohol intake can lead to development of chronic diseases. By comparing alcohol consumption between the US and South Korea, it was discovered that factors such as location, culture, as well as, occupation, play a role in both the type and amount of alcohol consumed. In both nations, alcohol consumption has been increasing each year. A study showed that 16,749 deaths were due to alcoholic liver disease in 2011 in the United States. In Korea, the percentage of cases of chronic liver diseases as incidences of acute pancreatitis have increased. Lastly, although many studies show the affect of alcohol on arteries and arterioles, not much work has been done on capillaries and veins.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.H.S.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorCohen, Zoeen
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