An Analysis of Light Adaptation and Inhibitory Input to Retinal Amacrine Cells

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/579406
Title:
An Analysis of Light Adaptation and Inhibitory Input to Retinal Amacrine Cells
Author:
Salazar, Aaron Josias
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The retina avoids signal saturation through the use of both dim-light sensing rod and bright-light sensing cone photoreceptor circuits. Photoreceptors are responsible for converting an image into an electrical signal, which is transmitted to bipolar cells and ganglion cells. Amacrine cells modulate the interaction between bipolar cells and ganglion cells through inhibitory signaling, and therefore play a large part in inner retinal processing. However, inhibitory connections between amacrine cells are a little understood signaling component of the retina. Within this study, amacrine cells within the mouse retina were separated into two categories: narrow-field glycinergic and wide-field GABAergic. Amacrine cells were subjected to a light stimuli under dark-adapted, light-adapted, and receptor isolated conditions, and the peak amplitude and charge transfer of the L-IPSC was measured. Wide-field amacrine cells received an increase in the percentage of inhibition from glycine after light adaptation. There is an overall decrease in spontaneous activity with light adaptation, but an increase in the percent of glycinergic spontaneous activity. Spatial inhibition to narrow-field amacrine cells becomes narrower with light adaptation. L-IPSC peak amplitude decreases with light adaptation with application of a full-field light stimulus, and also decreases as the distance between the stimulus and the cell body increases.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.H.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Physiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Eggers, Erika

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleAn Analysis of Light Adaptation and Inhibitory Input to Retinal Amacrine Cellsen_US
dc.contributor.authorSalazar, Aaron Josiasen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe retina avoids signal saturation through the use of both dim-light sensing rod and bright-light sensing cone photoreceptor circuits. Photoreceptors are responsible for converting an image into an electrical signal, which is transmitted to bipolar cells and ganglion cells. Amacrine cells modulate the interaction between bipolar cells and ganglion cells through inhibitory signaling, and therefore play a large part in inner retinal processing. However, inhibitory connections between amacrine cells are a little understood signaling component of the retina. Within this study, amacrine cells within the mouse retina were separated into two categories: narrow-field glycinergic and wide-field GABAergic. Amacrine cells were subjected to a light stimuli under dark-adapted, light-adapted, and receptor isolated conditions, and the peak amplitude and charge transfer of the L-IPSC was measured. Wide-field amacrine cells received an increase in the percentage of inhibition from glycine after light adaptation. There is an overall decrease in spontaneous activity with light adaptation, but an increase in the percent of glycinergic spontaneous activity. Spatial inhibition to narrow-field amacrine cells becomes narrower with light adaptation. L-IPSC peak amplitude decreases with light adaptation with application of a full-field light stimulus, and also decreases as the distance between the stimulus and the cell body increases.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.H.S.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorEggers, Erikaen
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