The Inflammation Game: A Literature Review of Arthritis, Multiple Sclerosis, and Obesity

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/579392
Title:
The Inflammation Game: A Literature Review of Arthritis, Multiple Sclerosis, and Obesity
Author:
Anhalt, Brandon Paul
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Inflammation is a microvascular response characterized by increased blood vessel diameter, increased vessel permeability, and increased white blood cell emigration from blood vessels to the affected tissue. It is an inherent mechanism of protection against further tissue damage upon infection or injury, but it can lead to pain and discomfort if left unchecked. Chronic Inflammation is a pathological condition defined by recurring active inflammation, tissue damage and repair attempts. The widespread presence of chronic inflammation makes it a prominent and relevant area of interest for patients and researchers alike. Arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and obesity are three conditions of particular interest that possess an inflammatory component and a wide array of treatment options. Patients with chronic inflammatory conditions are presented with a surplus of information by the media, internet, friends, and physicians and they must face the difficult decision of which treatments to invest in. This literature review is meant to provide an analysis of the options that come with inflammation treatment. In many cases, the most advantageous treatments are the traditional medications prescribed by a physician; however, several alternative treatments appear beneficial and may be used to supplement the prescribed medication as long as there are minimal adverse effects.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Physiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Cohen, Zoe

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleThe Inflammation Game: A Literature Review of Arthritis, Multiple Sclerosis, and Obesityen_US
dc.contributor.authorAnhalt, Brandon Paulen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractInflammation is a microvascular response characterized by increased blood vessel diameter, increased vessel permeability, and increased white blood cell emigration from blood vessels to the affected tissue. It is an inherent mechanism of protection against further tissue damage upon infection or injury, but it can lead to pain and discomfort if left unchecked. Chronic Inflammation is a pathological condition defined by recurring active inflammation, tissue damage and repair attempts. The widespread presence of chronic inflammation makes it a prominent and relevant area of interest for patients and researchers alike. Arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and obesity are three conditions of particular interest that possess an inflammatory component and a wide array of treatment options. Patients with chronic inflammatory conditions are presented with a surplus of information by the media, internet, friends, and physicians and they must face the difficult decision of which treatments to invest in. This literature review is meant to provide an analysis of the options that come with inflammation treatment. In many cases, the most advantageous treatments are the traditional medications prescribed by a physician; however, several alternative treatments appear beneficial and may be used to supplement the prescribed medication as long as there are minimal adverse effects.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorCohen, Zoeen
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