Long-Term Recovery of Naming Abilities for Individuals with Aphasia

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/579335
Title:
Long-Term Recovery of Naming Abilities for Individuals with Aphasia
Author:
Sachs, Alyssa Nicole Yuriko
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Aphasia is an acquired language impairment that can affect multiple aspects of an individual's communication. Although aphasia can vary with each individual, a universal characteristic is anomia, an impairment of naming abilities. Many studies have examined improvement of language skills over time in this population, but few specifically look at naming recovery over time. This study examined long-term recovery of naming abilities using the Boston Naming Test (BNT) scores from participants in the University of Arizona Aphasia Research Project. Each participant's overall change in BNT scores and the slope of their recovery were calculated to determine extent and rate of longitudinal naming improvement. In addition, independent variables including age, education, time post-onset (TPO) in months, and initial BNT score were evaluated for their predictive value relative to naming improvement. The effects of behavioral treatment—group, individual, and both—were also examined relative to BNT change. There was significant improvement on both the BNT change score and slope across all levels of severity and treatment groups. In addition, none of the independent variables were significant predictors of improvement. These results indicated that significant improvement of naming abilities is possible years after a stroke, regardless of demographics and initial severity.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Beeson, Pélagie M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleLong-Term Recovery of Naming Abilities for Individuals with Aphasiaen_US
dc.creatorSachs, Alyssa Nicole Yurikoen
dc.contributor.authorSachs, Alyssa Nicole Yurikoen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractAphasia is an acquired language impairment that can affect multiple aspects of an individual's communication. Although aphasia can vary with each individual, a universal characteristic is anomia, an impairment of naming abilities. Many studies have examined improvement of language skills over time in this population, but few specifically look at naming recovery over time. This study examined long-term recovery of naming abilities using the Boston Naming Test (BNT) scores from participants in the University of Arizona Aphasia Research Project. Each participant's overall change in BNT scores and the slope of their recovery were calculated to determine extent and rate of longitudinal naming improvement. In addition, independent variables including age, education, time post-onset (TPO) in months, and initial BNT score were evaluated for their predictive value relative to naming improvement. The effects of behavioral treatment—group, individual, and both—were also examined relative to BNT change. There was significant improvement on both the BNT change score and slope across all levels of severity and treatment groups. In addition, none of the independent variables were significant predictors of improvement. These results indicated that significant improvement of naming abilities is possible years after a stroke, regardless of demographics and initial severity.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineSpeech, Language, and Hearing Sciencesen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorBeeson, Pélagie M.en
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