The Decontamination of a Patient Room Using UV Light in a Long-Term Care Facility

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/579328
Title:
The Decontamination of a Patient Room Using UV Light in a Long-Term Care Facility
Author:
Peterson, Alexandra Deann
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The goal of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a new portable ultraviolet (UV) light system for disinfection of patient rooms in a long-term care facility (LTC). The Clorox Healthcareᵀᴹ Optimum-UVᵀᴹ system was placed in patient rooms in an LTC to determine the UV dose required to achieve a 99.9% (3-log) reduction of various nosocomial organisms (vancomycin-resistant enterococci, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium difficile, MS-2, and murine norovirus) on contaminated Formica and stainless steel coupons. All of the organisms and fomites achieved high log reductions. Additionally, samples were taken from high-touch areas located throughout the room and bathroom for naturally occurring bacteria. The naturally occurring bacteria surviving the UV light treatment were isolated from fomites in the patient's room and tested in the laboratory for their resistance to UV light. Laboratory studies using a collimated beam indicated that a UV exposure of 407,072 uW*sec/cm² was required for a 99.9% reduction. The use of the UV device in the patient's room is highly effective when surfaces are within 5 feet of the device for at least 5 minutes and demonstrates a new technology that can be useful in hospitals and LTCs to reduce the incidence of healthcare-associated infections.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Microbiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Gerba, Charles

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleThe Decontamination of a Patient Room Using UV Light in a Long-Term Care Facilityen_US
dc.creatorPeterson, Alexandra Deannen
dc.contributor.authorPeterson, Alexandra Deannen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe goal of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a new portable ultraviolet (UV) light system for disinfection of patient rooms in a long-term care facility (LTC). The Clorox Healthcareᵀᴹ Optimum-UVᵀᴹ system was placed in patient rooms in an LTC to determine the UV dose required to achieve a 99.9% (3-log) reduction of various nosocomial organisms (vancomycin-resistant enterococci, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium difficile, MS-2, and murine norovirus) on contaminated Formica and stainless steel coupons. All of the organisms and fomites achieved high log reductions. Additionally, samples were taken from high-touch areas located throughout the room and bathroom for naturally occurring bacteria. The naturally occurring bacteria surviving the UV light treatment were isolated from fomites in the patient's room and tested in the laboratory for their resistance to UV light. Laboratory studies using a collimated beam indicated that a UV exposure of 407,072 uW*sec/cm² was required for a 99.9% reduction. The use of the UV device in the patient's room is highly effective when surfaces are within 5 feet of the device for at least 5 minutes and demonstrates a new technology that can be useful in hospitals and LTCs to reduce the incidence of healthcare-associated infections.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineMicrobiologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorGerba, Charlesen
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