Trait Mindfulness and Emotion Regulation in an Older Adult Population

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/579315
Title:
Trait Mindfulness and Emotion Regulation in an Older Adult Population
Author:
Moushegian, Natasha Nicole
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Mindfulness is a multifaceted construct defined as a state of present-moment focus and nonjudgmental awareness of the current experience. It can be assessed in various ways including as a trait or dispositional characteristic. Mindfulness is associated with emotion regulation abilities but to date there is limited evidence for specificity of facets in this association and fewer studies examining this in older adults. The current study examined age differences in trait mindfulness and the association between (a) specific facets of mindfulness and (b) emotion regulation, in older and younger adults. We used the Five Faceted Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ; Baer, Smith, Hopkins, Krietemeyer, & Toney, 2006) and both objective and subjective measures of emotion regulation. Ten older adults and 39 younger adults completed the FFMQ and subsequently performed an Emotional Stroop task following negative mood induction. Results demonstrated significantly higher levels of trait mindfulness in older adults, particularly in the nonjudgment facet. Despite some indication of an association between nonjudgment and reduced emotional response for older adults, no correlations between FFMQ facets and emotion regulation measures were significant. These results suggest that older adults are more mindful than younger adults, and there is reason for further exploration of specific facets of mindfulness.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Glisky, Elizabeth

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleTrait Mindfulness and Emotion Regulation in an Older Adult Populationen_US
dc.creatorMoushegian, Natasha Nicoleen
dc.contributor.authorMoushegian, Natasha Nicoleen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractMindfulness is a multifaceted construct defined as a state of present-moment focus and nonjudgmental awareness of the current experience. It can be assessed in various ways including as a trait or dispositional characteristic. Mindfulness is associated with emotion regulation abilities but to date there is limited evidence for specificity of facets in this association and fewer studies examining this in older adults. The current study examined age differences in trait mindfulness and the association between (a) specific facets of mindfulness and (b) emotion regulation, in older and younger adults. We used the Five Faceted Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ; Baer, Smith, Hopkins, Krietemeyer, & Toney, 2006) and both objective and subjective measures of emotion regulation. Ten older adults and 39 younger adults completed the FFMQ and subsequently performed an Emotional Stroop task following negative mood induction. Results demonstrated significantly higher levels of trait mindfulness in older adults, particularly in the nonjudgment facet. Despite some indication of an association between nonjudgment and reduced emotional response for older adults, no correlations between FFMQ facets and emotion regulation measures were significant. These results suggest that older adults are more mindful than younger adults, and there is reason for further exploration of specific facets of mindfulness.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorGlisky, Elizabethen
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