War on Culture: The Destruction of Cultural Property During Civil Wars

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/579303
Title:
War on Culture: The Destruction of Cultural Property During Civil Wars
Author:
Nielsen, Beatrice Helena Date
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Acts of violence against civilians during conflict is a topic that has been examined increasingly in the literature on civil war. However, a systematic study on the destruction of cultural and religious sites as a strategic means to achieve territorial control has not yet been explored. I examine this aspect of civilian targeting in this project, and I argue that in many cases, combatants use cultural property as a tool to gain territory, coerce civilians, public perception, and degrade the social fabric of a given religion or population. In preliminary research, I have observed that destruction of a population‘s cultural property indicates and precurses a willingness to destroy human lives. Through a cross-national empirical analysis of civil wars in Iraq and Syria after 1990, I anticipate that the destruction of culturally significant objects and sites is not collateral damage during civil war, but rather intentional actions through which combatants achieve and exert power.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Geography
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Braithwaite, Jessica Maves

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleWar on Culture: The Destruction of Cultural Property During Civil Warsen_US
dc.creatorNielsen, Beatrice Helena Dateen
dc.contributor.authorNielsen, Beatrice Helena Dateen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractActs of violence against civilians during conflict is a topic that has been examined increasingly in the literature on civil war. However, a systematic study on the destruction of cultural and religious sites as a strategic means to achieve territorial control has not yet been explored. I examine this aspect of civilian targeting in this project, and I argue that in many cases, combatants use cultural property as a tool to gain territory, coerce civilians, public perception, and degrade the social fabric of a given religion or population. In preliminary research, I have observed that destruction of a population‘s cultural property indicates and precurses a willingness to destroy human lives. Through a cross-national empirical analysis of civil wars in Iraq and Syria after 1990, I anticipate that the destruction of culturally significant objects and sites is not collateral damage during civil war, but rather intentional actions through which combatants achieve and exert power.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineGeographyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorBraithwaite, Jessica Mavesen
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