Spectral Image Models of Planetary Systems for Simulating Exoplanet Observations

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/579279
Title:
Spectral Image Models of Planetary Systems for Simulating Exoplanet Observations
Author:
Lincowski, Andrew Peter
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Future missions to characterize exoplanets will require instruments tailored to finding a habitable exoplanet: suppressing the bright star while still directly observing planets at small angular separations. This problem is compounded by interplanetary dust, a significant source of astrophysical background noise. Instrument parameters must be constrained with detailed simulations, which can be analyzed to determine if the instruments are capable of discerning the desired exoplanet characteristics. A single observation of a planetary disk could constrain the mass of an exoplanet, an important parameter to identify an exoplanet as terrestrial, if the dust distribution varies by mass sufficiently to be distinguished by future instruments. As part of the NASA Haystacks team, this thesis presents work in completing high-fidelity spectral image cubes of our Solar System. New planetary system architectures are presented, designed to test whether we can distinguish between small and intermediate-mass planets by their effects on the dust structure. These spectral image cubes will be made available for processing through instrument simulators for future missions, allowing comparison of known disk structure with simulated observations of the disk.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Astronomy
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Pinto, Philip A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleSpectral Image Models of Planetary Systems for Simulating Exoplanet Observationsen_US
dc.creatorLincowski, Andrew Peteren
dc.contributor.authorLincowski, Andrew Peteren
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractFuture missions to characterize exoplanets will require instruments tailored to finding a habitable exoplanet: suppressing the bright star while still directly observing planets at small angular separations. This problem is compounded by interplanetary dust, a significant source of astrophysical background noise. Instrument parameters must be constrained with detailed simulations, which can be analyzed to determine if the instruments are capable of discerning the desired exoplanet characteristics. A single observation of a planetary disk could constrain the mass of an exoplanet, an important parameter to identify an exoplanet as terrestrial, if the dust distribution varies by mass sufficiently to be distinguished by future instruments. As part of the NASA Haystacks team, this thesis presents work in completing high-fidelity spectral image cubes of our Solar System. New planetary system architectures are presented, designed to test whether we can distinguish between small and intermediate-mass planets by their effects on the dust structure. These spectral image cubes will be made available for processing through instrument simulators for future missions, allowing comparison of known disk structure with simulated observations of the disk.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineAstronomyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorPinto, Philip A.en
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