Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/579274
Title:
Sleep and Language in Typical and Atypical Development
Author:
Hindley, Tricia Renee
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Sleep physiology changes across development from infancy to adulthood. Sleep and language-learning also change during development and into adulthood. This literature review identified several important correlations between quality of sleep and development. Sleep disruption can detrimentally affect language learning for all individuals. However, atypically developing individuals who have intellectual disabilities face distinctive challenges that sleep issues may further affect.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Neuroscience and Cognitive Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Edgin, Jamie

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleSleep and Language in Typical and Atypical Developmenten_US
dc.creatorHindley, Tricia Reneeen
dc.contributor.authorHindley, Tricia Reneeen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractSleep physiology changes across development from infancy to adulthood. Sleep and language-learning also change during development and into adulthood. This literature review identified several important correlations between quality of sleep and development. Sleep disruption can detrimentally affect language learning for all individuals. However, atypically developing individuals who have intellectual disabilities face distinctive challenges that sleep issues may further affect.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNeuroscience and Cognitive Scienceen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorEdgin, Jamieen
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