Self-Handicapping Play in Mountain Gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei): How Play Stimulates Emotional Regulation

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/579261
Title:
Self-Handicapping Play in Mountain Gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei): How Play Stimulates Emotional Regulation
Author:
Hawley, Caitlin Rose
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Play is sometimes considered frivolous and non-functional. Yet social play provides important ontogenetic opportunities for animals to socialize and regulate their behavior in a relaxed setting. Mountain gorillas are shown to self-handicap play behavior in specific contexts. Self-handicapping through movement restriction and to a lesser extent positional vulnerability are mediated by individual size and play pair type (i.e. dyads matched or mismatched in size). Within pairs of mismatched sizes, play behavior significantly differed between small and large subjects. Dyads of matched small players show greater degrees of movement restriction and positional vulnerability compared to mismatched dyads. Large partners highly restrict movement with small partners but do not do so with similarly sized partners. The interactive effect between individual size and pair type greatly impact the degree of self-handicapping in mountain gorillas. Benefits related to emotional regulation through play are discussed.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Tecot, Stacey

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleSelf-Handicapping Play in Mountain Gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei): How Play Stimulates Emotional Regulationen_US
dc.creatorHawley, Caitlin Roseen
dc.contributor.authorHawley, Caitlin Roseen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractPlay is sometimes considered frivolous and non-functional. Yet social play provides important ontogenetic opportunities for animals to socialize and regulate their behavior in a relaxed setting. Mountain gorillas are shown to self-handicap play behavior in specific contexts. Self-handicapping through movement restriction and to a lesser extent positional vulnerability are mediated by individual size and play pair type (i.e. dyads matched or mismatched in size). Within pairs of mismatched sizes, play behavior significantly differed between small and large subjects. Dyads of matched small players show greater degrees of movement restriction and positional vulnerability compared to mismatched dyads. Large partners highly restrict movement with small partners but do not do so with similarly sized partners. The interactive effect between individual size and pair type greatly impact the degree of self-handicapping in mountain gorillas. Benefits related to emotional regulation through play are discussed.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorTecot, Staceyen
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