Arizona's Senate Bill 1070: Understanding the Judicial Process, Constitutionality, Future and Effects of the Law

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/579259
Title:
Arizona's Senate Bill 1070: Understanding the Judicial Process, Constitutionality, Future and Effects of the Law
Author:
Ballesteros, Rennier Alejandro
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
After the passage of Arizona's Senate Bill 1070 back in 2010 Arizona has been under scrutiny due to the controversial anti-immigration law. In 2012 the Supreme Court struck down most of the provisions of the "Support Our Law Enforcement and Safe Neighborhoods Act" or commonly known as S.B. 1070, however the Supreme Court upheld the most controversial provision, Section 2 (B). This paper discusses the judicial process S.B. 1070 underwent since it was passed in 2010 up to the 2012 Supreme Court decision and also discusses the constitutionality issue of the law. This helps us understand how courts look at cases and what we are likely to see in the future if this law is challenged or if more S.B. 1070 copycat laws are passed like in Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina and other states. Lastly, the influence the law had on other states as well as the economic toll the bill had in Arizona and other states who adopted similar legislations is also discussed. It is difficult to predict if S.B. 1070 will ever be overturned, but we do know that this controversial anti-immigration law, S.B. 1070, adds to the negative perception and economic deficit of the state.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Political Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Westerland, Chad

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleArizona's Senate Bill 1070: Understanding the Judicial Process, Constitutionality, Future and Effects of the Lawen_US
dc.creatorBallesteros, Rennier Alejandroen
dc.contributor.authorBallesteros, Rennier Alejandroen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractAfter the passage of Arizona's Senate Bill 1070 back in 2010 Arizona has been under scrutiny due to the controversial anti-immigration law. In 2012 the Supreme Court struck down most of the provisions of the "Support Our Law Enforcement and Safe Neighborhoods Act" or commonly known as S.B. 1070, however the Supreme Court upheld the most controversial provision, Section 2 (B). This paper discusses the judicial process S.B. 1070 underwent since it was passed in 2010 up to the 2012 Supreme Court decision and also discusses the constitutionality issue of the law. This helps us understand how courts look at cases and what we are likely to see in the future if this law is challenged or if more S.B. 1070 copycat laws are passed like in Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina and other states. Lastly, the influence the law had on other states as well as the economic toll the bill had in Arizona and other states who adopted similar legislations is also discussed. It is difficult to predict if S.B. 1070 will ever be overturned, but we do know that this controversial anti-immigration law, S.B. 1070, adds to the negative perception and economic deficit of the state.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorWesterland, Chaden
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