Playing in Paradise: The Social Impacts of Beer Gardens in a Borderlands City 1870-1915

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/579248
Title:
Playing in Paradise: The Social Impacts of Beer Gardens in a Borderlands City 1870-1915
Author:
Herrera, Victoria Anne
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries Tucson, Arizona underwent a plethora of changes that impacted the community, including: shifts in majority ethnicity, increased industrialization, the introduction of the railroad, and a growing public interest in leisure culture. Between 1870 and 1915 three Beer Gardens existed in the city: Carrillo Gardens, Levin's Park, and Elysian Grove. Despite the city's changing environment these parks remained a focal point for community gathering. This paper will explore the ways in which Tucson's beer gardens helped foster blending in the community, and the limits to acceptance within the parks. Furthermore it will examine the differences between Tucson's leisure spaces and those in other United States cities, and explain how these beer gardens encouraged blending when other U.S. leisure spaces remained mostly segregated.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; History
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Morrissey, Katherine

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titlePlaying in Paradise: The Social Impacts of Beer Gardens in a Borderlands City 1870-1915en_US
dc.creatorHerrera, Victoria Anneen
dc.contributor.authorHerrera, Victoria Anneen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractIn the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries Tucson, Arizona underwent a plethora of changes that impacted the community, including: shifts in majority ethnicity, increased industrialization, the introduction of the railroad, and a growing public interest in leisure culture. Between 1870 and 1915 three Beer Gardens existed in the city: Carrillo Gardens, Levin's Park, and Elysian Grove. Despite the city's changing environment these parks remained a focal point for community gathering. This paper will explore the ways in which Tucson's beer gardens helped foster blending in the community, and the limits to acceptance within the parks. Furthermore it will examine the differences between Tucson's leisure spaces and those in other United States cities, and explain how these beer gardens encouraged blending when other U.S. leisure spaces remained mostly segregated.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorMorrissey, Katherineen
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