Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/579244
Title:
Cell Cycle Regulation of the Centriolar Protein Ana2
Author:
Dibble, Taylor Raymond
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The centrosome functions to nucleate microtubule growth and organize the mitotic spindle during cell division. The centrosome normally duplicates once per cell cycle, ensuring a bipolar spindle that divides sister chromatids equally between two daughter cells during mitosis. However, improper duplication or over-duplication of centrosomes can lead to chromosomal instability, a hallmark of cancer. Two barrel-shaped structures called centrioles function as the duplication factors for centrosomes. Mutations in important centriole structural proteins can cause either down-regulation or amplification of centriole duplication. One of these proteins, Ana2, is required for duplication and mutations in its human orthologue, STIL, can cause disorders in neurological development. Normally, Ana2 localizes to an existing ‘mother' centriole during S-phase and plays an essential role in the assembly of the procentriole that will become a mature ‘daughter' during G2. In this study, we identified changes in total cellular levels of Ana2 by arresting S2 Drosophila cells in different phases of the cell cycle and immunoblotting for Ana2. We found that levels of both endogenous Ana2 and transiently overexpressed Ana2 are low during G1 and increase during S-phase. Endogenous Ana2 levels were highest in G2, consistent with centriole maturation during this phase of the cell cycle.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Molecular and Cellular Biology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rogers, Gregory C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleCell Cycle Regulation of the Centriolar Protein Ana2en_US
dc.creatorDibble, Taylor Raymonden
dc.contributor.authorDibble, Taylor Raymonden
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe centrosome functions to nucleate microtubule growth and organize the mitotic spindle during cell division. The centrosome normally duplicates once per cell cycle, ensuring a bipolar spindle that divides sister chromatids equally between two daughter cells during mitosis. However, improper duplication or over-duplication of centrosomes can lead to chromosomal instability, a hallmark of cancer. Two barrel-shaped structures called centrioles function as the duplication factors for centrosomes. Mutations in important centriole structural proteins can cause either down-regulation or amplification of centriole duplication. One of these proteins, Ana2, is required for duplication and mutations in its human orthologue, STIL, can cause disorders in neurological development. Normally, Ana2 localizes to an existing ‘mother' centriole during S-phase and plays an essential role in the assembly of the procentriole that will become a mature ‘daughter' during G2. In this study, we identified changes in total cellular levels of Ana2 by arresting S2 Drosophila cells in different phases of the cell cycle and immunoblotting for Ana2. We found that levels of both endogenous Ana2 and transiently overexpressed Ana2 are low during G1 and increase during S-phase. Endogenous Ana2 levels were highest in G2, consistent with centriole maturation during this phase of the cell cycle.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineMolecular and Cellular Biologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorRogers, Gregory C.en
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.