The Relationship Between Public Opinion & Supreme Court Decisions: A Focus on Modern-Day Media Coverage

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/579242
Title:
The Relationship Between Public Opinion & Supreme Court Decisions: A Focus on Modern-Day Media Coverage
Author:
Cowan, Korey Nicholas
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The objective of this thesis is to investigate the dynamic relationship between public opinion and Supreme Court decisions. This thesis focuses on how media coverage plays a significant role in effecting this relationship. Using past research and findings, this thesis attempts to apply these conclusions to modern-day media sources such as the Internet. The findings from this thesis suggest that Slotnick and Segal's conclusion that the number of amicus curie briefs filed within a Supreme Court decision in addition to the subject area of a case continue to be the two most determinant factors in the level of media coverage which a Supreme Court decision will receive. Additionally, these findings suggest otherwise in Hoekstra's conclusion that local and national media sources report Supreme Court decisions differently than each other including the extent of their coverage over extended periods of time. Understanding this thesis' findings will assist in conceptualizing the significant role media coverage plays in the relationship between public opinion and Supreme Court decisions.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Political Science; Law
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Westerland, Chad

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleThe Relationship Between Public Opinion & Supreme Court Decisions: A Focus on Modern-Day Media Coverageen_US
dc.creatorCowan, Korey Nicholasen
dc.contributor.authorCowan, Korey Nicholasen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe objective of this thesis is to investigate the dynamic relationship between public opinion and Supreme Court decisions. This thesis focuses on how media coverage plays a significant role in effecting this relationship. Using past research and findings, this thesis attempts to apply these conclusions to modern-day media sources such as the Internet. The findings from this thesis suggest that Slotnick and Segal's conclusion that the number of amicus curie briefs filed within a Supreme Court decision in addition to the subject area of a case continue to be the two most determinant factors in the level of media coverage which a Supreme Court decision will receive. Additionally, these findings suggest otherwise in Hoekstra's conclusion that local and national media sources report Supreme Court decisions differently than each other including the extent of their coverage over extended periods of time. Understanding this thesis' findings will assist in conceptualizing the significant role media coverage plays in the relationship between public opinion and Supreme Court decisions.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen
thesis.degree.disciplineLawen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorWesterland, Chaden
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