The History and Process of Hoover Power Allocation: The Case of Arizona Post-2017

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/579151
Title:
The History and Process of Hoover Power Allocation: The Case of Arizona Post-2017
Author:
Hill, Ellen Louise
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The western region of the United States would not have developed without proper water development and management. The use of dams and other public works have developed ways of managing the West's natural water resources and its hydroelectric power. This paper explains the full history of how the West came to be United States territory and how water management developed in the West. Once a federal organization was set in place to control the water of the West, public works projects began to take shape in order to harness rivers, especially the Colorado River, for productive use in agriculture throughout the year. The paper goes into depth as to how he Hoover Dam was a major building block for control over the Colorado River. It not only held back the water, but also created clean, cheap power for the states of Arizona, California, and Nevada. The Arizona Power Authority allocates power for Arizona and they are currently in the process of determining who is eligible to receive power distribution for the post-2017 era. This process will be discussed in length and analysis as to what is best for the overall economic benefit for the state of Arizona.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Agribusiness Economics and Management
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Wilson, Paul

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleThe History and Process of Hoover Power Allocation: The Case of Arizona Post-2017en_US
dc.creatorHill, Ellen Louiseen
dc.contributor.authorHill, Ellen Louiseen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe western region of the United States would not have developed without proper water development and management. The use of dams and other public works have developed ways of managing the West's natural water resources and its hydroelectric power. This paper explains the full history of how the West came to be United States territory and how water management developed in the West. Once a federal organization was set in place to control the water of the West, public works projects began to take shape in order to harness rivers, especially the Colorado River, for productive use in agriculture throughout the year. The paper goes into depth as to how he Hoover Dam was a major building block for control over the Colorado River. It not only held back the water, but also created clean, cheap power for the states of Arizona, California, and Nevada. The Arizona Power Authority allocates power for Arizona and they are currently in the process of determining who is eligible to receive power distribution for the post-2017 era. This process will be discussed in length and analysis as to what is best for the overall economic benefit for the state of Arizona.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineAgribusiness Economics and Managementen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorWilson, Paulen
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