Investigation into the Lévy-Like Nature of College Student Walking Patterns

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/579146
Title:
Investigation into the Lévy-Like Nature of College Student Walking Patterns
Author:
Davidson, Jacob A.
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The "Lévy-Walk" is a movement pattern commonly used by foraging animals in order to maximize resource acquisition in patchy environments. The walk consists of long linear movements between resource patches followed by concentrated disorganized movements within these patches. This pattern is notable in that there is no characteristic scale, it has been seen in species of all sizes ranging from microorganisms to large animals. My thesis adviser has previously done research that indicated that a human group, the hunter-gatherer Hadza tribe of Tanzania, also displays Lévy-like movement when obtaining food. My thesis intended to investigate whether or not this walking strategy is exhibited in a non-foraging human population, college students at The University of Arizona. I asked several students to use an iPhone application which would record their movement. They were then asked to send me the data through an anonymous email account created specifically for this project. I received the data from several participants and sent it off to my adviser's colleague for analysis but unfortunately he was unable to get me any results. Thus I cannot come to a conclusion as to student walking patterns but I have learned a lot about conducting research.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Raichlen, David

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleInvestigation into the Lévy-Like Nature of College Student Walking Patternsen_US
dc.creatorDavidson, Jacob A.en
dc.contributor.authorDavidson, Jacob A.en
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe "Lévy-Walk" is a movement pattern commonly used by foraging animals in order to maximize resource acquisition in patchy environments. The walk consists of long linear movements between resource patches followed by concentrated disorganized movements within these patches. This pattern is notable in that there is no characteristic scale, it has been seen in species of all sizes ranging from microorganisms to large animals. My thesis adviser has previously done research that indicated that a human group, the hunter-gatherer Hadza tribe of Tanzania, also displays Lévy-like movement when obtaining food. My thesis intended to investigate whether or not this walking strategy is exhibited in a non-foraging human population, college students at The University of Arizona. I asked several students to use an iPhone application which would record their movement. They were then asked to send me the data through an anonymous email account created specifically for this project. I received the data from several participants and sent it off to my adviser's colleague for analysis but unfortunately he was unable to get me any results. Thus I cannot come to a conclusion as to student walking patterns but I have learned a lot about conducting research.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorRaichlen, Daviden
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