Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/579064
Title:
The Minnesota State Government in the Great Depression
Author:
Ten Haken, Wade Tyler
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Minnesota had a number of industries in the 1930s that played key roles in determining state policy. These industries included agriculture, flour, and lumber. During the time period, Minnesota politics became more radical in order to address the vast changes taking place that were brought on by the Great Depression. This radicalism brought on one of the most powerful state level third parties the nation has ever seen and possibly Minnesota's most successful governor. From 1929 to 1940, Minnesota's state legislature had many obstacles to overcome including an economic bubble in the agriculture industry, teamster strikes within the Twin Cities, and radical state-level politics. The legislature implemented numerous programs and tax policy changes to face these challenges, while the federal government passed the New Deal to address many of the same issues from a federal level. Many of these policies have been described by historians as successful while others have not. Based upon the statistics provided by the University of Arizona Economics Department, there may have been underlying economic factors that were overlooked.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Economics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Fishback, Price

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleThe Minnesota State Government in the Great Depressionen_US
dc.creatorTen Haken, Wade Tyleren
dc.contributor.authorTen Haken, Wade Tyleren
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractMinnesota had a number of industries in the 1930s that played key roles in determining state policy. These industries included agriculture, flour, and lumber. During the time period, Minnesota politics became more radical in order to address the vast changes taking place that were brought on by the Great Depression. This radicalism brought on one of the most powerful state level third parties the nation has ever seen and possibly Minnesota's most successful governor. From 1929 to 1940, Minnesota's state legislature had many obstacles to overcome including an economic bubble in the agriculture industry, teamster strikes within the Twin Cities, and radical state-level politics. The legislature implemented numerous programs and tax policy changes to face these challenges, while the federal government passed the New Deal to address many of the same issues from a federal level. Many of these policies have been described by historians as successful while others have not. Based upon the statistics provided by the University of Arizona Economics Department, there may have been underlying economic factors that were overlooked.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineEconomicsen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorFishback, Priceen
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.