Examining the Purchase of Local Food and Knowledge of Environmental Sustainability in Adult Low-Income Nutrition Education Program Participants in Pinal County, Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/579062
Title:
Examining the Purchase of Local Food and Knowledge of Environmental Sustainability in Adult Low-Income Nutrition Education Program Participants in Pinal County, Arizona
Author:
Turner, Rachel Joy
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The USDA Economic Research Service shows that 17.7% of Pinal County residents are living in poverty. Pinal County Cooperative Extension offers a Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and an Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) to low-income residents. Through their nutrition education programs, they encourage participants to purchase fresh foods from different locations. Typically, locally grown or locally produced foods are much fresher than imported foods. Local food also preserves open space, reduces food miles, and can support a more diverse and sustainable environment. Research shows that when shopping for their groceries, low-income consumers tend to shop at discount centers and supercenters where prices are lower than alternative locations. Research also shows that low-income SNAP participants who shop at discount centers and supercenters purchase less fresh foods than SNAP participants who shop at alternative locations. This study was created to answer the question, "How does knowledge of environment sustainability affect the purchase of local food in low-income consumers participating in nutrition education programs in Pinal County, Arizona?". The results of surveys suggested there is an association between the behavior of buying locally grown food and a participant's knowledge of environmental sustainability.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hongu, Nobuko

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleExamining the Purchase of Local Food and Knowledge of Environmental Sustainability in Adult Low-Income Nutrition Education Program Participants in Pinal County, Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorTurner, Rachel Joyen
dc.contributor.authorTurner, Rachel Joyen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe USDA Economic Research Service shows that 17.7% of Pinal County residents are living in poverty. Pinal County Cooperative Extension offers a Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and an Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) to low-income residents. Through their nutrition education programs, they encourage participants to purchase fresh foods from different locations. Typically, locally grown or locally produced foods are much fresher than imported foods. Local food also preserves open space, reduces food miles, and can support a more diverse and sustainable environment. Research shows that when shopping for their groceries, low-income consumers tend to shop at discount centers and supercenters where prices are lower than alternative locations. Research also shows that low-income SNAP participants who shop at discount centers and supercenters purchase less fresh foods than SNAP participants who shop at alternative locations. This study was created to answer the question, "How does knowledge of environment sustainability affect the purchase of local food in low-income consumers participating in nutrition education programs in Pinal County, Arizona?". The results of surveys suggested there is an association between the behavior of buying locally grown food and a participant's knowledge of environmental sustainability.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNatural Resourcesen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorHongu, Nobukoen
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