Poetry of the Slavophiles: Tracing Slavophile Philosophy Through 19th-Century Poetics

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/579060
Title:
Poetry of the Slavophiles: Tracing Slavophile Philosophy Through 19th-Century Poetics
Author:
Thompson, Aaron Michael
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This is the second part of an overview of the cultural history of Slavophiles, a term applicable to those ascribing to the traditional values, especially in relation to the philosophical treatises written by Aleksey Khomyakov, Ivan Kireevsky, and their contemporaries from 1839 to the middle 1860s. Having established the troika of themes at the treatises' foundation—the Russian state and Tsar, the Russian Orthodox Church, and the hierarchical governmental mir and sociocultural obshchina constructions present in history—I examine the philosophical, theological, and anthropological realities of poems by Khomyakov, Nikolai Yazykov, and Fyodor Tyutchev. My primary focus is on Tyutchev, a philosopher-poet and lifetime Slavophile who is known for many works which fall outside of this investigation. I will uncover and discuss how Khomyakov and Kireevsky's ideas are conveyed through the semiotics, rhetoric, and specific poetics of three decades of Tyutchev's oeuvre. In the end, I find that Tyutchev transversed through three phases, beginning with a personal construction of Slavdom or the Slavic obshchina , creating a relationship between Slavic and universally true good, and concluding with the development of the correlation between Western and evil. The final part of the Slavophile overview will the existing sociopolitical remnants of Slavophile ideologies in the 21st century.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Russian and Slavic Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Polowy, Teresa

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titlePoetry of the Slavophiles: Tracing Slavophile Philosophy Through 19th-Century Poeticsen_US
dc.creatorThompson, Aaron Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Aaron Michaelen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThis is the second part of an overview of the cultural history of Slavophiles, a term applicable to those ascribing to the traditional values, especially in relation to the philosophical treatises written by Aleksey Khomyakov, Ivan Kireevsky, and their contemporaries from 1839 to the middle 1860s. Having established the troika of themes at the treatises' foundation—the Russian state and Tsar, the Russian Orthodox Church, and the hierarchical governmental mir and sociocultural obshchina constructions present in history—I examine the philosophical, theological, and anthropological realities of poems by Khomyakov, Nikolai Yazykov, and Fyodor Tyutchev. My primary focus is on Tyutchev, a philosopher-poet and lifetime Slavophile who is known for many works which fall outside of this investigation. I will uncover and discuss how Khomyakov and Kireevsky's ideas are conveyed through the semiotics, rhetoric, and specific poetics of three decades of Tyutchev's oeuvre. In the end, I find that Tyutchev transversed through three phases, beginning with a personal construction of Slavdom or the Slavic obshchina , creating a relationship between Slavic and universally true good, and concluding with the development of the correlation between Western and evil. The final part of the Slavophile overview will the existing sociopolitical remnants of Slavophile ideologies in the 21st century.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineRussian and Slavic Studiesen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorPolowy, Teresaen
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