Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/579059
Title:
A Microscopic Survey of Olfactory Neurons in Insect Brains
Author:
Romero, Aracely Alicia
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The tobacco hawkmoth, Manduca sexta, is a model organism that has been used to understand how animal's olfactory systems process information. The neural circuits in its primary olfactory center, the AL, are analogous in many ways to the olfactory bulb in vertebrate species. In moths, individual neurons comprising the olfactory circuits in different synaptic centers are highly diverse and interconnected in very complicated ways, and thus are difficult to analyze. To overcome this problem, my project took "survey-like" approach to determine what types of individual neurons are connected to a specific largely unexplored higher olfactory center, the lateral horn. This region is targeted by all projection neurons-output neurons-of the AL. A particular region within the lateral horn (delta region) in male moths receives input from projection neurons that process information about conspecific female sex pheromone of this species. It remains unclear how many types of neurons innervate this region. An electroporation technique was used to probe this question using dissected male moths and passing a current through a dye-filled electrode. This technique allows the dye to be injected into the neurites in the vicinity of the electrode tip and travel through the inner network.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Biology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hildebrand, John G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleA Microscopic Survey of Olfactory Neurons in Insect Brainsen_US
dc.creatorRomero, Aracely Aliciaen
dc.contributor.authorRomero, Aracely Aliciaen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe tobacco hawkmoth, Manduca sexta, is a model organism that has been used to understand how animal's olfactory systems process information. The neural circuits in its primary olfactory center, the AL, are analogous in many ways to the olfactory bulb in vertebrate species. In moths, individual neurons comprising the olfactory circuits in different synaptic centers are highly diverse and interconnected in very complicated ways, and thus are difficult to analyze. To overcome this problem, my project took "survey-like" approach to determine what types of individual neurons are connected to a specific largely unexplored higher olfactory center, the lateral horn. This region is targeted by all projection neurons-output neurons-of the AL. A particular region within the lateral horn (delta region) in male moths receives input from projection neurons that process information about conspecific female sex pheromone of this species. It remains unclear how many types of neurons innervate this region. An electroporation technique was used to probe this question using dissected male moths and passing a current through a dye-filled electrode. This technique allows the dye to be injected into the neurites in the vicinity of the electrode tip and travel through the inner network.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineBiologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorHildebrand, John G.en
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