The Effect of Social Support in a Rodent Model of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/579058
Title:
The Effect of Social Support in a Rodent Model of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder
Author:
Uppalapati, Swetha
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental disorder developed from experience of or exposure to a traumatic event. In a rodent model of this disorder, we test whether social support, through co-housing, may be able to alleviate the long term anxiety normally displayed by animals after trauma. There were four groups: a single housed rat (shock or sham), a co-housed group with one shock and two sham rats (e.g. family support) and another co-housed group with three shock rats (e.g. group therapy). The results from a series of anxiety tests showed that the co-housed single shock group displayed decreased anxiety in the open field test, while the co-housed group shock rats showed decreased anxiety in the elevated plus maze test. The single housed shock group showed increased avoidance to the shock side of the shock box by the third exposure to it when compared to the co-housed single shock group. Translated to humans, this suggests that family support and group therapy support may have differential effects that may be beneficial in certain environments. These results also indicate that having social support is generally more effective in reducing anxiety than lack of support.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Neuroscience and Cognitive Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Fellous, Jean-Marc

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleThe Effect of Social Support in a Rodent Model of Post Traumatic Stress Disorderen_US
dc.creatorUppalapati, Swethaen
dc.contributor.authorUppalapati, Swethaen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractPost-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental disorder developed from experience of or exposure to a traumatic event. In a rodent model of this disorder, we test whether social support, through co-housing, may be able to alleviate the long term anxiety normally displayed by animals after trauma. There were four groups: a single housed rat (shock or sham), a co-housed group with one shock and two sham rats (e.g. family support) and another co-housed group with three shock rats (e.g. group therapy). The results from a series of anxiety tests showed that the co-housed single shock group displayed decreased anxiety in the open field test, while the co-housed group shock rats showed decreased anxiety in the elevated plus maze test. The single housed shock group showed increased avoidance to the shock side of the shock box by the third exposure to it when compared to the co-housed single shock group. Translated to humans, this suggests that family support and group therapy support may have differential effects that may be beneficial in certain environments. These results also indicate that having social support is generally more effective in reducing anxiety than lack of support.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNeuroscience and Cognitive Scienceen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorFellous, Jean-Marcen
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