Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/579046
Title:
The Role of Memory in Adult Language Acquisition
Author:
Wang, Alisa Shien-Jye
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Procedural, declarative, and working memory systems appear to play an important role in language learning. This paper seeks to determine the relationship between these memory systems and adult native English speakers' ability to learn foreign sound dimensions. Participants' declarative, procedural, and working memory capacities were assessed. Participants were also asked to complete a sound categorization task in a foreign language environment, where they cannot rely on their native language knowledge and their access to explicit reasoning strategies is blocked via a working memory task. We predicted that individuals with greater procedural memory capacity would better learn foreign sound categories under these conditions, because procedural memory skills appear to support implicit learning of new information and integration of dimensions. In contrast, we found that a greater declarative memory capacity positively correlated with accuracy in the sound categorization task. We also found a positive correlation between a higher working memory capacity and more balanced cue weighting (integration of different dimensions) in the sound categorization task. There were no correlations between the sound categorization task and procedural memory assessment performance; these findings indicate that declarative and working memory capacities likely play a larger role than previously indicated.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Gerken, LouAnn

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleThe Role of Memory in Adult Language Acquisitionen_US
dc.creatorWang, Alisa Shien-Jyeen
dc.contributor.authorWang, Alisa Shien-Jyeen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractProcedural, declarative, and working memory systems appear to play an important role in language learning. This paper seeks to determine the relationship between these memory systems and adult native English speakers' ability to learn foreign sound dimensions. Participants' declarative, procedural, and working memory capacities were assessed. Participants were also asked to complete a sound categorization task in a foreign language environment, where they cannot rely on their native language knowledge and their access to explicit reasoning strategies is blocked via a working memory task. We predicted that individuals with greater procedural memory capacity would better learn foreign sound categories under these conditions, because procedural memory skills appear to support implicit learning of new information and integration of dimensions. In contrast, we found that a greater declarative memory capacity positively correlated with accuracy in the sound categorization task. We also found a positive correlation between a higher working memory capacity and more balanced cue weighting (integration of different dimensions) in the sound categorization task. There were no correlations between the sound categorization task and procedural memory assessment performance; these findings indicate that declarative and working memory capacities likely play a larger role than previously indicated.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineSpeech, Language, and Hearing Sciencesen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorGerken, LouAnnen
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