Do You Want to Lucid Dream? Might You Want to Try Meditating on It? How Lucid Dreaming Relates to MAAS, and Hours of Practice in Long-Term Meditators

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/579038
Title:
Do You Want to Lucid Dream? Might You Want to Try Meditating on It? How Lucid Dreaming Relates to MAAS, and Hours of Practice in Long-Term Meditators
Author:
Day, Brandon
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Dreams have fascinated humanity since the time of the Greeks. With the development of EEG, we now know that they tend to occur during REM sleep and lucid dreams are characterized by a meta-awareness during the sleeping state (Laberge, 1990). Historically, meditation has cultivated this state (Holzinger, 2009) and meditators have unique dream experiences, which suggests that they are suitable to test dreaming hypotheses (Albert et al., 1974). Additionally, lucid dreaming and mindfulness share neural correlates (Dresler et al., 2012; Ivanovski and Malhi, 2007). Based on pilot data indicating self-reported lucid dreams distinguishes more mindful from less mindful meditators (Day, unpublished), a second study of meditators correlated a log of their total meditation hours and the MAAS, with their lucid dream experience. The fact that the two mindfulness measures did not correlate, suggests they measure different constructs. Meditation hours, however, positively correlated to lucid dreaming, supporting the theory that meta-awareness in wake relates to meta-awareness in sleep. It appears that the MAAS is not a good measure of mindfulness, and future research should work to improve the measures.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Jacobs, William Jake

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleDo You Want to Lucid Dream? Might You Want to Try Meditating on It? How Lucid Dreaming Relates to MAAS, and Hours of Practice in Long-Term Meditatorsen_US
dc.creatorDay, Brandonen
dc.contributor.authorDay, Brandonen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractDreams have fascinated humanity since the time of the Greeks. With the development of EEG, we now know that they tend to occur during REM sleep and lucid dreams are characterized by a meta-awareness during the sleeping state (Laberge, 1990). Historically, meditation has cultivated this state (Holzinger, 2009) and meditators have unique dream experiences, which suggests that they are suitable to test dreaming hypotheses (Albert et al., 1974). Additionally, lucid dreaming and mindfulness share neural correlates (Dresler et al., 2012; Ivanovski and Malhi, 2007). Based on pilot data indicating self-reported lucid dreams distinguishes more mindful from less mindful meditators (Day, unpublished), a second study of meditators correlated a log of their total meditation hours and the MAAS, with their lucid dream experience. The fact that the two mindfulness measures did not correlate, suggests they measure different constructs. Meditation hours, however, positively correlated to lucid dreaming, supporting the theory that meta-awareness in wake relates to meta-awareness in sleep. It appears that the MAAS is not a good measure of mindfulness, and future research should work to improve the measures.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorJacobs, William Jakeen
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