Pink Tides: Femininity, Dictatorship, and the Rise of the New Latin American Left

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/579025
Title:
Pink Tides: Femininity, Dictatorship, and the Rise of the New Latin American Left
Author:
Piatt, Jennifer Lauren
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
During the second half of the twentieth century, military dictatorships came to power throughout Southern Cone Latin America and contributed to the continued patriarchal tradition of the region. A literary and art movement arose after these dictatorships fell, centered on the patterns of re-victimization of the feminine and criticism of the atrocities carried out by the dictatorships. In my honors thesis, I argue that along with the rise of the marea rosada, the New Left in Latin America, we have witnessed a turn in post-dictatorship literature towards a criticism of the society that fostered the dictatorships and that continued the patriarchal traditions of the region. I also argue that the authors and directors of these texts and films advocate that in order to change the patriarchal pattern of society, it is necessary to participate within that society and manipulate the society's discourses to one's own advantage.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Spanish
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Mahler, Anne Garland

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titlePink Tides: Femininity, Dictatorship, and the Rise of the New Latin American Leften_US
dc.creatorPiatt, Jennifer Laurenen
dc.contributor.authorPiatt, Jennifer Laurenen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractDuring the second half of the twentieth century, military dictatorships came to power throughout Southern Cone Latin America and contributed to the continued patriarchal tradition of the region. A literary and art movement arose after these dictatorships fell, centered on the patterns of re-victimization of the feminine and criticism of the atrocities carried out by the dictatorships. In my honors thesis, I argue that along with the rise of the marea rosada, the New Left in Latin America, we have witnessed a turn in post-dictatorship literature towards a criticism of the society that fostered the dictatorships and that continued the patriarchal traditions of the region. I also argue that the authors and directors of these texts and films advocate that in order to change the patriarchal pattern of society, it is necessary to participate within that society and manipulate the society's discourses to one's own advantage.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineSpanishen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorMahler, Anne Garlanden
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.