Healthcare Inequality & Fraud Prevention: Paternalism Justified to Enable Choice

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/579024
Title:
Healthcare Inequality & Fraud Prevention: Paternalism Justified to Enable Choice
Author:
Reaves, Michael Leland
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Under the newest health policy in the United States, The Patient Protection & Affordable Care Act, Medicaid expansions in consenting states enable low-income individuals to obtain health insurance. Part I provides an argument defending a positive duty to facilitate choice in health services. The section discusses the conflict in political theory on health inequity, and why an expansion of Medicaid is the most effective plan to improve the health status of America. Part II provides an argument to increase funding to government agencies responsible for prosecuting fraud, waste, and abuse in the healthcare sector. Every dollar of funding to healthcare fraud prevention yields an eightfold return, yet many argue for budget cuts to sustain other government programs. Well-funded agencies are necessary if the government wishes to recover the billions lost each year to criminal activity. One solution is a redirection of funds from wasteful sectors to more effective programs. Congress should choose to fund programs that produce better health and economic outcomes for the U.S. Paternalism is justified to enable choice in this sector by reducing healthcare inequality, improving health outcomes, and recovering funds typically forfeited to criminals.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Philosophy, Politics, Economics and Law
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Adams, Pamela

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleHealthcare Inequality & Fraud Prevention: Paternalism Justified to Enable Choiceen_US
dc.creatorReaves, Michael Lelanden
dc.contributor.authorReaves, Michael Lelanden
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractUnder the newest health policy in the United States, The Patient Protection & Affordable Care Act, Medicaid expansions in consenting states enable low-income individuals to obtain health insurance. Part I provides an argument defending a positive duty to facilitate choice in health services. The section discusses the conflict in political theory on health inequity, and why an expansion of Medicaid is the most effective plan to improve the health status of America. Part II provides an argument to increase funding to government agencies responsible for prosecuting fraud, waste, and abuse in the healthcare sector. Every dollar of funding to healthcare fraud prevention yields an eightfold return, yet many argue for budget cuts to sustain other government programs. Well-funded agencies are necessary if the government wishes to recover the billions lost each year to criminal activity. One solution is a redirection of funds from wasteful sectors to more effective programs. Congress should choose to fund programs that produce better health and economic outcomes for the U.S. Paternalism is justified to enable choice in this sector by reducing healthcare inequality, improving health outcomes, and recovering funds typically forfeited to criminals.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePhilosophy, Politics, Economics and Lawen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorAdams, Pamelaen
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