Transforming Truth: Cinematic Adaptations of Black Feminist Literature

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/579011
Title:
Transforming Truth: Cinematic Adaptations of Black Feminist Literature
Author:
Thomson, Paul Michael
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
My paper begs the questions, "What do we lose in the adaptation of Black Feminist literature to film? And is there anything to gain from said adaptations?" Through close readings of both the texts and films of three stories lauded for their introduction of Black Feminist themes, I analyze the ways in which these adaptations contribute to the tenets of Black Feminism and the ways in which they betray them. The literary texts and subsequent cinematic adaptations I explore are: The Color Purple by Alice Walker; The Women of Brewster Place by Gloria Naylor; and for colored girls who have considered suicide/ when the rainbow is enuf (and its adaptation For Colored Girls) by Ntozake Shange. Ultimately, my research finds that these adaptations are unsuccessful in their adherence to Black Feminist themes presented in the original works. From the sacrificing of LGBT content to the reliance on negative stereotypes of African-American women, the film adaptations of these lauded novels may sometimes do more harm than good.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Africana Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sanchez, Tani

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleTransforming Truth: Cinematic Adaptations of Black Feminist Literatureen_US
dc.creatorThomson, Paul Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorThomson, Paul Michaelen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractMy paper begs the questions, "What do we lose in the adaptation of Black Feminist literature to film? And is there anything to gain from said adaptations?" Through close readings of both the texts and films of three stories lauded for their introduction of Black Feminist themes, I analyze the ways in which these adaptations contribute to the tenets of Black Feminism and the ways in which they betray them. The literary texts and subsequent cinematic adaptations I explore are: The Color Purple by Alice Walker; The Women of Brewster Place by Gloria Naylor; and for colored girls who have considered suicide/ when the rainbow is enuf (and its adaptation For Colored Girls) by Ntozake Shange. Ultimately, my research finds that these adaptations are unsuccessful in their adherence to Black Feminist themes presented in the original works. From the sacrificing of LGBT content to the reliance on negative stereotypes of African-American women, the film adaptations of these lauded novels may sometimes do more harm than good.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineAfricana Studiesen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorSanchez, Tanien
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