Racism and Prejudice in the Twentieth Century: A Tale of Jazz Music and its Musicians

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/579007
Title:
Racism and Prejudice in the Twentieth Century: A Tale of Jazz Music and its Musicians
Author:
Ehredt, Amanda Renee
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This thesis explores the prejudice and tense racial relations minority jazz musicians experienced in the early to mid-twentieth century. By analyzing the lives and careers of Louis Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald, Frank Sinatra, and Artie Shaw the thesis attempts to answer the following questions: What were the experiences of early jazz musicians? How did White and Black jazz artists interact and cooperate with one another? What obstacles did each race face in the efforts to integrate? And finally, what lasting influences did discrimination have upon the musicians? These particular individuals were chosen because of their immense talent, fame, and relatively wide spread influence across multiple decades of jazz music; together, they provide a widespread view of the era. Through various integration efforts, these black and ethnic white jazz artists worked together in order to overcome both the negative image that American society had of jazz music and the negative image that American society held in regards to minorities.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; History
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Garcia, Juan

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleRacism and Prejudice in the Twentieth Century: A Tale of Jazz Music and its Musiciansen_US
dc.creatorEhredt, Amanda Reneeen
dc.contributor.authorEhredt, Amanda Reneeen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThis thesis explores the prejudice and tense racial relations minority jazz musicians experienced in the early to mid-twentieth century. By analyzing the lives and careers of Louis Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald, Frank Sinatra, and Artie Shaw the thesis attempts to answer the following questions: What were the experiences of early jazz musicians? How did White and Black jazz artists interact and cooperate with one another? What obstacles did each race face in the efforts to integrate? And finally, what lasting influences did discrimination have upon the musicians? These particular individuals were chosen because of their immense talent, fame, and relatively wide spread influence across multiple decades of jazz music; together, they provide a widespread view of the era. Through various integration efforts, these black and ethnic white jazz artists worked together in order to overcome both the negative image that American society had of jazz music and the negative image that American society held in regards to minorities.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorGarcia, Juanen
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