The Challenge Hypothesis: Fecal Cortisol Levels in Male Red-Bellied Lemurs During the Reproductive Season

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/579006
Title:
The Challenge Hypothesis: Fecal Cortisol Levels in Male Red-Bellied Lemurs During the Reproductive Season
Author:
Stolar, Lillian Anna
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In red-bellied lemurs (Eulemur rubriventer), a pair-bonded, monogamous species with paternal care, male fecal cortisol levels fluctuate over the reproductive season. The Challenge Hypothesis suggests a relationship between mating and infant care systems and hormone levels. During mating, fecal cortisol levels should be low due to little male-male mate competition. During gestation, males and females should have correlated hormonal responses if males prepare for infant care during their mate's pregnancy. Throughout infant growth, male fecal cortisol levels should elevate because paternal care is present. Red-bellied lemur male fecal cortisol levels were compared across reproductive seasons, and with their mate's fecal cortisol levels. Fecal cortisol levels were low during the mating season, higher during gestation, and highest around birth. During gestation, fecal cortisol levels were lower in males than females, and male fecal cortisol levels elevated about one to two weeks after their mate's. These results support predictions based on the Challenge Hypothesis, and suggest a paternal hormonal profile in this species.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Tecot, Stacey

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleThe Challenge Hypothesis: Fecal Cortisol Levels in Male Red-Bellied Lemurs During the Reproductive Seasonen_US
dc.creatorStolar, Lillian Annaen
dc.contributor.authorStolar, Lillian Annaen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractIn red-bellied lemurs (Eulemur rubriventer), a pair-bonded, monogamous species with paternal care, male fecal cortisol levels fluctuate over the reproductive season. The Challenge Hypothesis suggests a relationship between mating and infant care systems and hormone levels. During mating, fecal cortisol levels should be low due to little male-male mate competition. During gestation, males and females should have correlated hormonal responses if males prepare for infant care during their mate's pregnancy. Throughout infant growth, male fecal cortisol levels should elevate because paternal care is present. Red-bellied lemur male fecal cortisol levels were compared across reproductive seasons, and with their mate's fecal cortisol levels. Fecal cortisol levels were low during the mating season, higher during gestation, and highest around birth. During gestation, fecal cortisol levels were lower in males than females, and male fecal cortisol levels elevated about one to two weeks after their mate's. These results support predictions based on the Challenge Hypothesis, and suggest a paternal hormonal profile in this species.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorTecot, Staceyen
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