Speaking Like a Lady: College Students' Perceptions on the Differences between Men and Women in Public Speaking

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/578993
Title:
Speaking Like a Lady: College Students' Perceptions on the Differences between Men and Women in Public Speaking
Author:
Macaulay, Kaitlyn
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study is to determine how the attire of male and female public speakers affects college students‟ perception of their credibility. This study was conducted by having a sample of currently enrolled undergraduate students watch a video recording of a male speaker and a female speaker give an identical speech and then evaluate each of them based on ten sets of criteria. The male and female speaker each had three possible videos for the speakers to watch where they were either dressed casually, professionally, or night-out attire. After assessing the two speakers in the random appearance selection, each participant filled out a demographics questionnaire to provide information about their gender, age, ethnicity, and political affiliation. Unfortunately the results proved to have little to no significance with the difference scales based on credibility of each speaker. This is mainly due to the lack of sample size for the participants, indicating that although the topic of this study is of interest, it needs a larger sample size for future investigations in order to yield significant results.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Communication
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Dues, Michael

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleSpeaking Like a Lady: College Students' Perceptions on the Differences between Men and Women in Public Speakingen_US
dc.creatorMacaulay, Kaitlynen
dc.contributor.authorMacaulay, Kaitlynen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study is to determine how the attire of male and female public speakers affects college students‟ perception of their credibility. This study was conducted by having a sample of currently enrolled undergraduate students watch a video recording of a male speaker and a female speaker give an identical speech and then evaluate each of them based on ten sets of criteria. The male and female speaker each had three possible videos for the speakers to watch where they were either dressed casually, professionally, or night-out attire. After assessing the two speakers in the random appearance selection, each participant filled out a demographics questionnaire to provide information about their gender, age, ethnicity, and political affiliation. Unfortunately the results proved to have little to no significance with the difference scales based on credibility of each speaker. This is mainly due to the lack of sample size for the participants, indicating that although the topic of this study is of interest, it needs a larger sample size for future investigations in order to yield significant results.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorDues, Michaelen
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