Interpretations of Suffering and Individual Differences in Worldviews

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/578980
Title:
Interpretations of Suffering and Individual Differences in Worldviews
Author:
Aguirre, Ina Angelia
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Cultural worldviews play an important role in how people perceive suffering in the world. Suffering can be seen in a repressive manner and in a redemptive manner. Two worldviews that have been identified as possible predictors of differences in suffering interpretation are humanism and normativism. The present study examined the association between humanism and redemptive suffering construal, and between normativism and repressive suffering construal. Other variables such as the Belief in a Just World and intrinsic religiosity were also assessed. We hypothesized that humanism and normativism may be uniquely associated with redemptive and repressive construals of suffering. Results supported the hypothesis: significant positive associations were found between redemptive construal of suffering and humanism, as well as between repressive construal and normativism. Repressive suffering construal was also associated with the belief in a just world for others and intrinsic religiosity. These findings provide additional evidence of the polarity between humanism and normativism and the distinction between repressive and redemptive suffering construals.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sullivan, Daniel

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleInterpretations of Suffering and Individual Differences in Worldviewsen_US
dc.creatorAguirre, Ina Angeliaen
dc.contributor.authorAguirre, Ina Angeliaen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractCultural worldviews play an important role in how people perceive suffering in the world. Suffering can be seen in a repressive manner and in a redemptive manner. Two worldviews that have been identified as possible predictors of differences in suffering interpretation are humanism and normativism. The present study examined the association between humanism and redemptive suffering construal, and between normativism and repressive suffering construal. Other variables such as the Belief in a Just World and intrinsic religiosity were also assessed. We hypothesized that humanism and normativism may be uniquely associated with redemptive and repressive construals of suffering. Results supported the hypothesis: significant positive associations were found between redemptive construal of suffering and humanism, as well as between repressive construal and normativism. Repressive suffering construal was also associated with the belief in a just world for others and intrinsic religiosity. These findings provide additional evidence of the polarity between humanism and normativism and the distinction between repressive and redemptive suffering construals.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorSullivan, Danielen
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