Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/578977
Title:
Effects of Hormone Crosstalk on Endophytic Bacterial Communities
Author:
Abidov, Amir
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The plant hormones salicylic and jasmonic acid (SA and JA, respectively) both play a crucial role in the induction of plant defense system pathways and long-term pathogen resistance. Plants, which do not have an active cellular immune system like animals, instead rely on the release of specific molecules to mediate defense. In general, the SA pathway is activated by biotrophic pathogens and primarily induces antimicrobial responses, while JA is activated by necrotrophic pathogens and herbivory, and induces separate chemical responses. SA and JA are reciprocally antagonistic: activation of one pathway inhibits activation of the other. Here we explore how SA-JA inhibitory crosstalk is used by pathogens or herbivores to combat plant defense. We study the effects of hormone crosstalk on bacterial growth in two plant models: Cardamine cordifolia and Arabidopsis thaliana, which we treated to induce defense pathways. These plants were inoculated with endophytic bacteria isolated from field C. cordifolia plants, and the effects of hormone treatment on bacterial growth rates were measured. We show that JA-induced defenses, which are commonly associated with necrotrophic pathogens, affect varied biotrophic Pseudomonas strains both positively and negatively. Notably, we show that JA-induce defenses affect wild P. fluorescens strains more negatively than SA-defenses.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Biology - Biomedical Science Focus
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Whiteman, Noah

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleEffects of Hormone Crosstalk on Endophytic Bacterial Communitiesen_US
dc.creatorAbidov, Amiren
dc.contributor.authorAbidov, Amiren
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe plant hormones salicylic and jasmonic acid (SA and JA, respectively) both play a crucial role in the induction of plant defense system pathways and long-term pathogen resistance. Plants, which do not have an active cellular immune system like animals, instead rely on the release of specific molecules to mediate defense. In general, the SA pathway is activated by biotrophic pathogens and primarily induces antimicrobial responses, while JA is activated by necrotrophic pathogens and herbivory, and induces separate chemical responses. SA and JA are reciprocally antagonistic: activation of one pathway inhibits activation of the other. Here we explore how SA-JA inhibitory crosstalk is used by pathogens or herbivores to combat plant defense. We study the effects of hormone crosstalk on bacterial growth in two plant models: Cardamine cordifolia and Arabidopsis thaliana, which we treated to induce defense pathways. These plants were inoculated with endophytic bacteria isolated from field C. cordifolia plants, and the effects of hormone treatment on bacterial growth rates were measured. We show that JA-induced defenses, which are commonly associated with necrotrophic pathogens, affect varied biotrophic Pseudomonas strains both positively and negatively. Notably, we show that JA-induce defenses affect wild P. fluorescens strains more negatively than SA-defenses.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineBiology - Biomedical Science Focusen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorWhiteman, Noahen
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