An Investigation of Quitting and Relapse Cycles in Long-Term Methamphetamine Use

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/578958
Title:
An Investigation of Quitting and Relapse Cycles in Long-Term Methamphetamine Use
Author:
Elmore, Alexis Marie
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Introduction: Methamphetamine addiction cycles through phases of quitting and relapse generally proceeded by "turning points," significant life events in users' lives. This study examines turning points in the lives of rural women who use methamphetamine. Methods: 45 qualitative drug history interviews with female methamphetamine users (pulled from parent study) were analyzed for emergent themes of turning points associated with either quitting or relapse. Results: Analyses revealed 5 distinct emergent themes: relationships (subthemes of family, friends, and domestic partners), health (subthemes of pregnancy, withdrawal symptoms, and stress), treatment, department of corrections (DOC), and lifestyle. Relationships, health, and lifestyle stood as dynamic themes initiating either quitting or relapse; treatment and DOC were associated solely with quit attempts from methamphetamine. Conclusions: Strong patterns emerged of women becoming clean during pregnancy and for significant chunks of time after giving birth, with relapse reasons generally unclear but closely tied to current relationships and stress. Changing friend groups strongly influenced changing addiction behavior. DOC was shown to initiate quitting but was not shown to maintain long term quitting behavior. Limitations include generalizability of the data given demographic homogeneity of the interview sample. Future studies would focus on specific histories of cyclical addiction and turning points.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bowen, Anne

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleAn Investigation of Quitting and Relapse Cycles in Long-Term Methamphetamine Useen_US
dc.creatorElmore, Alexis Marieen
dc.contributor.authorElmore, Alexis Marieen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Methamphetamine addiction cycles through phases of quitting and relapse generally proceeded by "turning points," significant life events in users' lives. This study examines turning points in the lives of rural women who use methamphetamine. Methods: 45 qualitative drug history interviews with female methamphetamine users (pulled from parent study) were analyzed for emergent themes of turning points associated with either quitting or relapse. Results: Analyses revealed 5 distinct emergent themes: relationships (subthemes of family, friends, and domestic partners), health (subthemes of pregnancy, withdrawal symptoms, and stress), treatment, department of corrections (DOC), and lifestyle. Relationships, health, and lifestyle stood as dynamic themes initiating either quitting or relapse; treatment and DOC were associated solely with quit attempts from methamphetamine. Conclusions: Strong patterns emerged of women becoming clean during pregnancy and for significant chunks of time after giving birth, with relapse reasons generally unclear but closely tied to current relationships and stress. Changing friend groups strongly influenced changing addiction behavior. DOC was shown to initiate quitting but was not shown to maintain long term quitting behavior. Limitations include generalizability of the data given demographic homogeneity of the interview sample. Future studies would focus on specific histories of cyclical addiction and turning points.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorBowen, Anneen
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