The Representation of Games in 18th-Century Rococo Painting: Differences in the Discourse Between Children and Adults

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/578954
Title:
The Representation of Games in 18th-Century Rococo Painting: Differences in the Discourse Between Children and Adults
Author:
Brashear, Cherise Lukacs
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This essay explores the significance of depicting children's games in 18th-century Rococo painting and the differences in intended meanings when applied to children versus adults. More specifically, the focus of my research is on the use of these games to exhibit moral lessons among adolescents and expose the connotations of fickleness, courtship, and eroticism when directed at aristocratic adults. The specific images that will be included in my discussion are Jean-Honoré Fragonard's Happy Hazards of the Swing (1767) and Blind Man's Bluff (c.a. 1750-1752), Jean-Baptiste-Siméon Chardin's Soap Bubbles (1733-34) and The Young Schoolmistress (ca. 1735-36), Jacques-Phillipe Le Bas's Blind Man's Buff (1737), and Nicolas Lancret's Blind Man's Bluff (c. 1728). I will also discuss the relevance of these paintings within their time period and the cultural politics of the eighteenth-century that would have had an impact on the development and interpretation of these images.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Art History
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Plax, Julie-Anne

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleThe Representation of Games in 18th-Century Rococo Painting: Differences in the Discourse Between Children and Adultsen_US
dc.creatorBrashear, Cherise Lukacsen
dc.contributor.authorBrashear, Cherise Lukacsen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThis essay explores the significance of depicting children's games in 18th-century Rococo painting and the differences in intended meanings when applied to children versus adults. More specifically, the focus of my research is on the use of these games to exhibit moral lessons among adolescents and expose the connotations of fickleness, courtship, and eroticism when directed at aristocratic adults. The specific images that will be included in my discussion are Jean-Honoré Fragonard's Happy Hazards of the Swing (1767) and Blind Man's Bluff (c.a. 1750-1752), Jean-Baptiste-Siméon Chardin's Soap Bubbles (1733-34) and The Young Schoolmistress (ca. 1735-36), Jacques-Phillipe Le Bas's Blind Man's Buff (1737), and Nicolas Lancret's Blind Man's Bluff (c. 1728). I will also discuss the relevance of these paintings within their time period and the cultural politics of the eighteenth-century that would have had an impact on the development and interpretation of these images.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineArt Historyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorPlax, Julie-Anneen
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.