Developing a Theory of Exploitation in the Context of Penal Labor in the Federal Prison Industries

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/578952
Title:
Developing a Theory of Exploitation in the Context of Penal Labor in the Federal Prison Industries
Author:
Mahon, Nicholas
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Discussions of non-Marxist theories of exploitation over the past few decades have opened up debates on the nature of exploitative interactions. The substance of these discussions vary widely in how they define exploitation and, if they find it problematic, vary in how best to understand and ameliorate the moral problems associated with exploitation. Enter into this debate an age-old public policy, penal labor. Every day in the United State federal prison system, thousands of inmates go to work through Federal Prison Industries, a program created by President Franklin Roosevelt in 1934. These inmates, who by federal law are required to work if given the opportunity, earn sub-minimum wages with a maximum hourly wage of $1.15 and many earn as little as $0.23 an hour. In light of the historical and modern debate over the exploitation of workers, this paper will seek to answer how the Federal Prison Industries operates and justifies sub-minimal wages, discuss the current philosophical debate regarding exploitation, and conclude by asserting that the current system of penal labor in federal prisons in the United State is not exploitative due to the benefits given to the inmates.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Philosophy, Politics, Economics and Law
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Wall, Steven

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleDeveloping a Theory of Exploitation in the Context of Penal Labor in the Federal Prison Industriesen_US
dc.creatorMahon, Nicholasen
dc.contributor.authorMahon, Nicholasen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractDiscussions of non-Marxist theories of exploitation over the past few decades have opened up debates on the nature of exploitative interactions. The substance of these discussions vary widely in how they define exploitation and, if they find it problematic, vary in how best to understand and ameliorate the moral problems associated with exploitation. Enter into this debate an age-old public policy, penal labor. Every day in the United State federal prison system, thousands of inmates go to work through Federal Prison Industries, a program created by President Franklin Roosevelt in 1934. These inmates, who by federal law are required to work if given the opportunity, earn sub-minimum wages with a maximum hourly wage of $1.15 and many earn as little as $0.23 an hour. In light of the historical and modern debate over the exploitation of workers, this paper will seek to answer how the Federal Prison Industries operates and justifies sub-minimal wages, discuss the current philosophical debate regarding exploitation, and conclude by asserting that the current system of penal labor in federal prisons in the United State is not exploitative due to the benefits given to the inmates.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePhilosophy, Politics, Economics and Lawen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorWall, Stevenen
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