"Today is the Day to Shout Mansei": The Culture of Resistance in Korea During the Japanese Imperial Period, 1905-1945

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/578951
Title:
"Today is the Day to Shout Mansei": The Culture of Resistance in Korea During the Japanese Imperial Period, 1905-1945
Author:
Kitkowski, Ryan Windsor
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The traditional framework in which resistance to is understood and discussed is limited largely to clear and pointed acts of resistance undertaken by organized groups. In the work of historian James C. Scott, particularly the book Domination of the Arts of Resistance: Hidden Transcripts, one finds an enormous diversity in the ways a subordinate population—and the individuals therein—can resist a dominant power. These ways of resisting extend outside the forms of resistance limited to organized group activity and acts of violence against the dominant group. The history of Japanese imperial rule in Korea [1905-1945] has not been characterized by consistent or widespread resistance under the traditional framework. However, as shown in this thesis, by adopting an alternative framework based off of Scott's work, and utilizing it to examine acts of resistance in the experiences and lives of Koreans who lived during the Japanese colonial period of Korean history, there is enough evidence to support the collective social existence of a Korean culture of resistance.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; History
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Clancy-Smith, Julia

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.title"Today is the Day to Shout Mansei": The Culture of Resistance in Korea During the Japanese Imperial Period, 1905-1945en_US
dc.creatorKitkowski, Ryan Windsoren
dc.contributor.authorKitkowski, Ryan Windsoren
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe traditional framework in which resistance to is understood and discussed is limited largely to clear and pointed acts of resistance undertaken by organized groups. In the work of historian James C. Scott, particularly the book Domination of the Arts of Resistance: Hidden Transcripts, one finds an enormous diversity in the ways a subordinate population—and the individuals therein—can resist a dominant power. These ways of resisting extend outside the forms of resistance limited to organized group activity and acts of violence against the dominant group. The history of Japanese imperial rule in Korea [1905-1945] has not been characterized by consistent or widespread resistance under the traditional framework. However, as shown in this thesis, by adopting an alternative framework based off of Scott's work, and utilizing it to examine acts of resistance in the experiences and lives of Koreans who lived during the Japanese colonial period of Korean history, there is enough evidence to support the collective social existence of a Korean culture of resistance.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorClancy-Smith, Juliaen
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