Isolating the Effect of Naps on Verb-Generalization in 3 Year-Olds

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/578928
Title:
Isolating the Effect of Naps on Verb-Generalization in 3 Year-Olds
Author:
Whiteside, Kelsey Kristin
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Research has shown that young children tend to pay more attention to objects than to the motions of or relationships between objects, and in order to get past this tendency, children need to see the verb performed multiple times by the same exemplars. This suggests that children are limited in their ability to generalize upon first learning a verb. Given research that sleep promotes generalization, this study investigates the role of napping in verb-generalization of three year olds. In Experiment 1 participants were trained on new verbs and tested on generalization immediately, and in Experiment 2 participants were trained on verbs and tested after a 4.5 hour delay which included a nap. Participants in Experiment 1 did not generalize the verbs at significantly higher-than-chance score. Participants in Experiment 2 also did not generalize the verbs at a significantly higher-than-chance score, but the mean approached significance and possibly created a trend with previously reported data. Compared with previous studies, these results indicate that (1) sleep plays an active role in verb-generalization and (2) verb-generalization may be the result of a combination of nap and nighttime sleep.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Gómez, Rebecca

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleIsolating the Effect of Naps on Verb-Generalization in 3 Year-Oldsen_US
dc.creatorWhiteside, Kelsey Kristinen
dc.contributor.authorWhiteside, Kelsey Kristinen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractResearch has shown that young children tend to pay more attention to objects than to the motions of or relationships between objects, and in order to get past this tendency, children need to see the verb performed multiple times by the same exemplars. This suggests that children are limited in their ability to generalize upon first learning a verb. Given research that sleep promotes generalization, this study investigates the role of napping in verb-generalization of three year olds. In Experiment 1 participants were trained on new verbs and tested on generalization immediately, and in Experiment 2 participants were trained on verbs and tested after a 4.5 hour delay which included a nap. Participants in Experiment 1 did not generalize the verbs at significantly higher-than-chance score. Participants in Experiment 2 also did not generalize the verbs at a significantly higher-than-chance score, but the mean approached significance and possibly created a trend with previously reported data. Compared with previous studies, these results indicate that (1) sleep plays an active role in verb-generalization and (2) verb-generalization may be the result of a combination of nap and nighttime sleep.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorGómez, Rebeccaen
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