Ecological Impacts of Mine Pollutants in Patagonia, Arizona: Studying the Effects of Heavy Metals on Aquatic Ecosystems

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/578899
Title:
Ecological Impacts of Mine Pollutants in Patagonia, Arizona: Studying the Effects of Heavy Metals on Aquatic Ecosystems
Author:
Wong, Jayme Nicole
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Mine tailings pollute surrounding waterways with high levels of heavy metals leftover from mining and milling processes. In arid climates like Arizona, these pollutants are transported to surrounding environments and downstream via aeolian transport (wind), and via precipitation from seasonal storms like Arizona's monsoon season. Elemental analyses for invertebrates were conducted twice per year at 8 sites throughout 3 locations in Patagonia, Arizona. The sites were all downstream of a mine, and drained into Patagonia Lake. Elemental analyses for fish were conducted at Patagonia Lake with the same frequency. These were done for 12 heavy metals. Sufficient data was collected only for Dysticidae invertebrates at Alum Gulch, and as expected, our results showed higher levels of heavy metals at our sites post-monsoon season (with the exception of mercury and manganese). This increase in heavy metal concentrations can be attributed to transport by precipitation from monsoonal storms. Increases in heavy metal concentrations were also found for all 12 elements in fish of Patagonia Lake.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Reinthal, Peter

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleEcological Impacts of Mine Pollutants in Patagonia, Arizona: Studying the Effects of Heavy Metals on Aquatic Ecosystemsen_US
dc.creatorWong, Jayme Nicoleen
dc.contributor.authorWong, Jayme Nicoleen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractMine tailings pollute surrounding waterways with high levels of heavy metals leftover from mining and milling processes. In arid climates like Arizona, these pollutants are transported to surrounding environments and downstream via aeolian transport (wind), and via precipitation from seasonal storms like Arizona's monsoon season. Elemental analyses for invertebrates were conducted twice per year at 8 sites throughout 3 locations in Patagonia, Arizona. The sites were all downstream of a mine, and drained into Patagonia Lake. Elemental analyses for fish were conducted at Patagonia Lake with the same frequency. These were done for 12 heavy metals. Sufficient data was collected only for Dysticidae invertebrates at Alum Gulch, and as expected, our results showed higher levels of heavy metals at our sites post-monsoon season (with the exception of mercury and manganese). This increase in heavy metal concentrations can be attributed to transport by precipitation from monsoonal storms. Increases in heavy metal concentrations were also found for all 12 elements in fish of Patagonia Lake.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineEcology and Evolutionary Biologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorReinthal, Peteren
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