Understanding the Biological Basis of Cognitive Aging: The Role of Inhibitory Interneurons

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/578894
Title:
Understanding the Biological Basis of Cognitive Aging: The Role of Inhibitory Interneurons
Author:
Burkhart, Jessica Cheri; Takamatsu, Chelsea; Gray, Daniel; Barnes, Carol A.
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Previous studies reveal decreases in hippocampal interneuron cell densities during normal aging. However, considerable variation in results exists within the literature. Overall, interneuron populations show either decreases or conservation in cell numbers expressing calcium binding proteins parvalbumin (PV) and calbindin (CB), and neuropeptides somatostatin (SOM) and neuropeptite Y (NPY) in hippocampal subregions of CA1, CA3, dentate granule cell layer, and dentate hilus. Notably, only few of the past aging studies showed correlations in cell loss with behavioral impairments in aged animals. This issue was addressed in the present study using male, young and old Fischer 344 rats, that were behaviorally characterized on four tasks before immunohistochemical staining and cell type quantification. Rats performed the Morris Watermaze, W-Track Continuous Spatial Alternation Task, Spontaneous Object Recognition (SOR) task, and Temporal Object Recognition (TOR) task. The old rats showed age-related deficits only in hippocampal-dependent memory tasks. Immunofluorescent imaging revealed an increase in SOM-immunoreactive interneurons in the dentate granule cell layer, as well as an increase in NPY expression in the dentate hilus. All other regions in which neurons were quantified showed no changes in any of the selected interneuron types examined. Contrary to previous findings, we found no decreases in interneuron populations anywhere in the hippocampus.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Neuroscience & Cognitive Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Barnes, Carol

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleUnderstanding the Biological Basis of Cognitive Aging: The Role of Inhibitory Interneuronsen_US
dc.creatorBurkhart, Jessica Cherien
dc.creatorTakamatsu, Chelseaen
dc.creatorGray, Danielen
dc.creatorBarnes, Carol A.en
dc.contributor.authorBurkhart, Jessica Cherien
dc.contributor.authorTakamatsu, Chelseaen
dc.contributor.authorGray, Danielen
dc.contributor.authorBarnes, Carol A.en
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractPrevious studies reveal decreases in hippocampal interneuron cell densities during normal aging. However, considerable variation in results exists within the literature. Overall, interneuron populations show either decreases or conservation in cell numbers expressing calcium binding proteins parvalbumin (PV) and calbindin (CB), and neuropeptides somatostatin (SOM) and neuropeptite Y (NPY) in hippocampal subregions of CA1, CA3, dentate granule cell layer, and dentate hilus. Notably, only few of the past aging studies showed correlations in cell loss with behavioral impairments in aged animals. This issue was addressed in the present study using male, young and old Fischer 344 rats, that were behaviorally characterized on four tasks before immunohistochemical staining and cell type quantification. Rats performed the Morris Watermaze, W-Track Continuous Spatial Alternation Task, Spontaneous Object Recognition (SOR) task, and Temporal Object Recognition (TOR) task. The old rats showed age-related deficits only in hippocampal-dependent memory tasks. Immunofluorescent imaging revealed an increase in SOM-immunoreactive interneurons in the dentate granule cell layer, as well as an increase in NPY expression in the dentate hilus. All other regions in which neurons were quantified showed no changes in any of the selected interneuron types examined. Contrary to previous findings, we found no decreases in interneuron populations anywhere in the hippocampus.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNeuroscience & Cognitive Scienceen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorBarnes, Carolen
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