Technological Analysis of Pueblo I Lead Glazed Ceramics from the Upper San Juan Basin, Colorado (ca.700-850 CE)

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/578888
Title:
Technological Analysis of Pueblo I Lead Glazed Ceramics from the Upper San Juan Basin, Colorado (ca.700-850 CE)
Author:
Santarelli, Brunella
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release 12-Aug-2017
Abstract:
The production of lead glaze paints has intrigued Southwestern archaeologists since the 1930s, and significant efforts have been dedicated to the study of this technology by researchers interested in the Pueblo IV (ca. 1275-1400 CE) glazes. In this dissertation I explore the technology of production of the earliest glaze paints produced in the Southwest: the Pueblo I (ca. 700-850 CE) glaze paints from the Upper San Juan. These glaze paints were produced nearly 500 years before the later and well studied Pueblo IV glaze paints, and these technologies represent two separate, independent instances of invention of glaze technology in the prehistoric Southwest. The unique aspect of prehistoric Southwestern glazes is that they were developed as paints, thus serving as decorations. Glaze paints are culturally and technologically significant because it is in the production of the paint that potters are innovating and experimenting with materials. This dissertation presents evidence for a patterned technological behavior in the production of Pueblo I glaze paints - while there is no evidence of specialization, there is evidence for shared technological knowledge regarding other aspects of production. The lack of control over the variability in visual appearance as related to the variability in compositions indicates that it is unlikely that any differences in composition represent intentional technological choices; therefore, Pueblo I potters were not using standardized recipes in the production of glaze paints. I argue that potters were aware of the effect of applying a lead-based paint to the ceramic, thus indicating intentionality, but could not control all of the variables that are involved in the production of a ceramic ware. To understand the mechanisms of invention, and later abandonment, of this technology, I looked for clues in the history of ceramic production in the area, and coupled it with a study of the social and environmental constraints placed on the production. My research suggests that the production of the Pueblo I glaze paints, while not as specialized and widespread as that of the later glaze paints, is a significant technological component of the sequence of ceramic production in the Southwest.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Materials Science & Engineering
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Materials Science & Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Odegaard, Nancy N.; Killick, David J.
Committee Chair:
Odegaard, Nancy N.; Killick, David J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleTechnological Analysis of Pueblo I Lead Glazed Ceramics from the Upper San Juan Basin, Colorado (ca.700-850 CE)en_US
dc.creatorSantarelli, Brunellaen
dc.contributor.authorSantarelli, Brunellaen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.releaseRelease 12-Aug-2017en
dc.description.abstractThe production of lead glaze paints has intrigued Southwestern archaeologists since the 1930s, and significant efforts have been dedicated to the study of this technology by researchers interested in the Pueblo IV (ca. 1275-1400 CE) glazes. In this dissertation I explore the technology of production of the earliest glaze paints produced in the Southwest: the Pueblo I (ca. 700-850 CE) glaze paints from the Upper San Juan. These glaze paints were produced nearly 500 years before the later and well studied Pueblo IV glaze paints, and these technologies represent two separate, independent instances of invention of glaze technology in the prehistoric Southwest. The unique aspect of prehistoric Southwestern glazes is that they were developed as paints, thus serving as decorations. Glaze paints are culturally and technologically significant because it is in the production of the paint that potters are innovating and experimenting with materials. This dissertation presents evidence for a patterned technological behavior in the production of Pueblo I glaze paints - while there is no evidence of specialization, there is evidence for shared technological knowledge regarding other aspects of production. The lack of control over the variability in visual appearance as related to the variability in compositions indicates that it is unlikely that any differences in composition represent intentional technological choices; therefore, Pueblo I potters were not using standardized recipes in the production of glaze paints. I argue that potters were aware of the effect of applying a lead-based paint to the ceramic, thus indicating intentionality, but could not control all of the variables that are involved in the production of a ceramic ware. To understand the mechanisms of invention, and later abandonment, of this technology, I looked for clues in the history of ceramic production in the area, and coupled it with a study of the social and environmental constraints placed on the production. My research suggests that the production of the Pueblo I glaze paints, while not as specialized and widespread as that of the later glaze paints, is a significant technological component of the sequence of ceramic production in the Southwest.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectMaterials Science & Engineeringen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineMaterials Science & Engineeringen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorOdegaard, Nancy N.en
dc.contributor.advisorKillick, David J.en
dc.contributor.chairOdegaard, Nancy N.en
dc.contributor.chairKillick, David J.en
dc.contributor.committeememberOdegaard, Nancy N.en
dc.contributor.committeememberKillick, David J.en
dc.contributor.committeememberVandiver, Pamela B.en
dc.contributor.committeememberFenn, Thomas Ren
dc.contributor.committeememberPotter, Barrett G.en
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