African American Elders' Psycho-Social-Spiritual Healing across Serious Illness

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/578887
Title:
African American Elders' Psycho-Social-Spiritual Healing across Serious Illness
Author:
Coats, Heather Lea
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release 13-Aug-2017
Abstract:
Background: Disparities in care for seriously ill African American (AA) elders exist because of gaps in knowledge regarding culturally sensitive physiological, psychological, social, and spiritual needs and preferences. Conceptual Framework: The foundation of culturally sensitive patient-centered PC is formed from social, spiritual, psychological and physical experiences of serious illness. Purpose: Aim 1 was to describe categories and patterns of psych-social-spiritual healing from the perspective of AA elders with serious illness. Aim 2 was to examine the NIH Clinical Center's psych-social-spiritual healing measure as a valid, culturally appropriate measure for this population. Methods: A purposive sample of 28 AA elders with serious illnesses and from the Jackson MS area participated in this study. Aim One used the qualitative method of narrative analysis. Aim Two used cognitive interviewing methodology, including verbal probing and think aloud techniques. Findings: Aim One: Prior experiences, I changed, and Across past, present experiences and future expectations were the three main of the thematic analysis. The thematic categories in prior experiences were: been through it...made me strong, I thought about…others, and went down little hills...got me down. The thematic categories in I changed were: I grew stronger, changed priorities, do things I never would have done, and quit doing. The thematic categories in Across past, present experiences and future expectations were: God did and will take care of me, close-knit relationships, and life is better. The most prevalent theme of God did and will take care of me was divided into subthemes of: God did, God will and developing faith. Aim Two: Of the fifty-three items on the Psychological-Social-Spiritual Healing instrument, thirty-seven items were retained, eight items revised, and eight items deleted. Conclusions: Aim one: The narratives were stories of remarkable strength. This strength was grounded in the participants' "faith" in God that helped the aging seriously ill AA elder "overcome things." Aim Two: Linguistic validity was enhanced with expert input from the seriously ill AA elders. Pragmatic validity, using both the research team and participants' input, improved the content validity. These findings provide evidence towards a more valid and culturally sensitive tool.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Aging; Health Care Disparities; Nursing; Palliative Care; Religion/Spirituality; Nursing; African Americans
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rosenfeld, Anne

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleAfrican American Elders' Psycho-Social-Spiritual Healing across Serious Illnessen_US
dc.creatorCoats, Heather Leaen
dc.contributor.authorCoats, Heather Leaen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.releaseRelease 13-Aug-2017en
dc.description.abstractBackground: Disparities in care for seriously ill African American (AA) elders exist because of gaps in knowledge regarding culturally sensitive physiological, psychological, social, and spiritual needs and preferences. Conceptual Framework: The foundation of culturally sensitive patient-centered PC is formed from social, spiritual, psychological and physical experiences of serious illness. Purpose: Aim 1 was to describe categories and patterns of psych-social-spiritual healing from the perspective of AA elders with serious illness. Aim 2 was to examine the NIH Clinical Center's psych-social-spiritual healing measure as a valid, culturally appropriate measure for this population. Methods: A purposive sample of 28 AA elders with serious illnesses and from the Jackson MS area participated in this study. Aim One used the qualitative method of narrative analysis. Aim Two used cognitive interviewing methodology, including verbal probing and think aloud techniques. Findings: Aim One: Prior experiences, I changed, and Across past, present experiences and future expectations were the three main of the thematic analysis. The thematic categories in prior experiences were: been through it...made me strong, I thought about…others, and went down little hills...got me down. The thematic categories in I changed were: I grew stronger, changed priorities, do things I never would have done, and quit doing. The thematic categories in Across past, present experiences and future expectations were: God did and will take care of me, close-knit relationships, and life is better. The most prevalent theme of God did and will take care of me was divided into subthemes of: God did, God will and developing faith. Aim Two: Of the fifty-three items on the Psychological-Social-Spiritual Healing instrument, thirty-seven items were retained, eight items revised, and eight items deleted. Conclusions: Aim one: The narratives were stories of remarkable strength. This strength was grounded in the participants' "faith" in God that helped the aging seriously ill AA elder "overcome things." Aim Two: Linguistic validity was enhanced with expert input from the seriously ill AA elders. Pragmatic validity, using both the research team and participants' input, improved the content validity. These findings provide evidence towards a more valid and culturally sensitive tool.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectAgingen
dc.subjectHealth Care Disparitiesen
dc.subjectNursingen
dc.subjectPalliative Careen
dc.subjectReligion/Spiritualityen
dc.subjectNursingen
dc.subjectAfrican Americansen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorRosenfeld, Anneen
dc.contributor.committeememberRosenfeld, Anneen
dc.contributor.committeememberCrist, Janise D.en
dc.contributor.committeememberBerger, Annen
dc.contributor.committeememberSternberg, Estheren
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